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We have some code that looks like this:

class Serializer
{
public:
    template<class Type> void Write(const Type& value)
    {
        internal_write((byte*)value, sizeof(Type));
    }

    // some overloads of Write that take care of some tricky type we have defined

private:
    // implementation of internal_write
};

As one might guess this writes data to a disk. We have similar Read functions that more or less cast some bytes to a type. Not as robust as it could be, but it works, because we write on the same platform as we read--meaning that the bytes we write match what we need to read.

We are now moving to support multiple platforms. We have in several places code like:

unsigned long trust_me_this_will_be_fine = get_unsigned_long();
a_serializer.Write(trust_me_this_will_be_fine);

That works fine in the current world, but if we assume that one of the platforms we want to support has unsigned long as 32-bit and on another they are 64-bit, we are hosed.

I'd like to change Serializer::Write to only take explicitly-sized types as parameters. I thought about this:

class Serializer
{
public:
   void Write(uint32_t value) { ... }
   void Write(uint64_t value) { ... }
};

But I don't think that really solves the problem because on the 32-bit system, an unsigned long will be automatically converted into auint32_t but on a 64-bit system it will be auto-converted into a uint64_t.

What I really want here is to make Write(uint32_t) only accept parameters of type uint32_t--meaning that it would require an explicit cast. I don't think there's a direct way to do that--if I am wrong, please tell me.

Short of that, I can think of two ways to solve this.

  1. Declare (but don't define) private versions of Serializer::Write for every type that could be auto-converted into a type we support.
  2. Don't take a uint32_t directly, but a class that holds a uint32_t and only has an explicit constructor for a uint32_t.

Option 2 would look something like this:

class only_uint32
{
public:
    uint32_t _value;
    explicit only_uint32(uint_32 value) : _value(value) { }
};

class Serializer
{
public:
    void Write(only_uint32 value) { ... }
};

Then calling code looks like this:

unsigned long might_just_work = get_unsigned_long();
a_serializer.Write(static_cast<uint32_t>(might_just_work)); // should work, and be explicitly sized.
a_serializer.Write(might_just_work); // won't compile

I assume many people have solved this type of problem. Is there a preferred way of doing this that I haven't thought of? Is one of my ideas terrible, great, workable, anything?

P.S.: Yes, I understand this is a super-long post. It's a somewhat complex and detailed problem, though.

Update:

Thanks for the ideas and help. I think we're going with solution that like this:

class Serializer
{
public:
    template<class Type> void Write32(const Type& value)
    {
        static_assert(sizeof(Type) == 4, "Write32 must be called on a 32-bit value.");
        internal_write(reinterpret_cast<byte*>(value), 4);
    }
    // overloads like Write64 and various tricky types as before.

private:
    // implementation of internal_write
};

This is a fairly low-cost (in terms of engineering time) solution that succeeds at pushing knowledge of what you're actually saving out to the caller and forces the caller to know what they are calling.

share|improve this question
1  
It wouldn't matter if you had a type that had an explicit constructor for uint32_t because you could just pass something else convertible to uint32_t to the constructor and it would be converted to a uint32_t there –  Seth Carnegie Feb 2 '12 at 5:57
    
Sigh. But of course you're right. –  SirPentor Feb 2 '12 at 6:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could do something like this:

template<typename T>
class MyClass {
public:
    static_assert(sizeof(T) == sizeof(uint32_t), "Invalid type");
    MyClass(T t) : data(t) { }

private:
    uint32_t data;
};

Or if you want to accept only uint32_ts:

template<typename T>
class MyClass {
public:
    static_assert(is_same<T, uint32_t>::value, "Invalid type");
    MyClass(T t) : data(t) { }

private:
    uint32_t data;
};
share|improve this answer

You could use a static assertion, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%2B%2B11#Static_assertions to prevent callers from using "wrong-sized" types. This is available in C++11, if your compiler does not support it, you could use http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_48_0/doc/html/boost_staticassert.html which does the same thing.

share|improve this answer
    
I like the simplicity of this idea. I had totally forgotten about good-old CASSERT (as they call it in windows headers). –  SirPentor Feb 2 '12 at 6:16
    
Actually, wait. Where would you put the static_assert in this case? By the time we're in Serializer::Write, it's too late, isn't it? (though @Sethc may be describing the same thing as you...) –  SirPentor Feb 2 '12 at 6:32

You can use a pointer for these builtins:

void Write(const uint32_t* const value);
void Write(const uint64_t* const value);

in use:

const uint8_t a= …;
ser.Write(a);  // oops!
ser.Write(&a); // oops!

Or you can use reference which cannot be promoted (that is, pass a mutable reference if the type is builtin), but that's bad and a bit noisy.

This works because:

  • a value, const value, or const reference may be promoted or narrowed to another type, if convertible.
  • a pointer, const pointer, and a non-const reference cannot be promoted. exception: If you're using an old version of VS, it allowed value-to-mutable-reference promotions (non-standard).
share|improve this answer
    
Verifying I understand what you mean: This works because the compiler won't auto-convert pointers? –  SirPentor Feb 2 '12 at 6:17
1  
@SirPentor that's right - answer expanded –  justin Feb 2 '12 at 6:22

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