Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What's the best way to change a big array into multiple sub arrays based on the property of the objects in the original array? For example I have an array of objects(all objects have the same properties):

array = [
    {:name => "Jim", :amount => "20"},
    {:name => "Jim", :amount => "40"},
    {:name => "Jim", :amount => "30"},
    {:name => "Eddie", :amount => "7"},
    {:name => "Eddie", :amount => "12"},
    {:name => "Pony", :amount => "330"},
    {:name => "Pony", :amount => "220"},
    {:name => "Pony", :amount => "50"}
]

Note that all objects with the same name property are consecutive in the array. Now I want to group the objects into sub arrays based on the name property. What I need is:

result = [
    [
        {:name => "Jim", :amount => "20"},
        {:name => "Jim", :amount => "40"},
        {:name => "Jim", :amount => "30"}
    ],
    [
        {:name => "Eddie", :amount => "7"},
        {:name => "Eddie", :amount => "12"}
    ],
    [
        {:name => "Pony", :amount => "330"},
        {:name => "Pony", :amount => "220"},
        {:name => "Pony", :amount => "50"}
    ]
]

What's the best way to do this? Thanks.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Use group_by for the heavy lifting and then map to pull out what you want:

result = array.group_by { |h| h[:name] }.map { |k, v| v }

For example:

>> results = array.group_by { |h| h[:name] }.map { |k, v| v }
>> pp results
[[{:name=>"Jim", :amount=>"20"},
  {:name=>"Jim", :amount=>"40"},
  {:name=>"Jim", :amount=>"30"}],
 [{:name=>"Eddie", :amount=>"7"},
  {:name=>"Eddie", :amount=>"12"}],
 [{:name=>"Pony", :amount=>"330"},
  {:name=>"Pony", :amount=>"220"},
  {:name=>"Pony", :amount=>"50"}]]

You could also skip the map and go straight to Hash#values:

result = array.group_by { |h| h[:name] }.values

Thanks go to KandadaBoggu for pointing out this oversight.

share|improve this answer
2  
Probably you can shorten this further by calling values on the group_by result, i.e. array.group_by{ |h| h[:name] }.values –  Harish Shetty Mar 2 '12 at 6:16
    
@KandadaBoggu: Yeah, that would work and I'm a little embarrassed that I didn't see that first. –  mu is too short Mar 2 '12 at 6:30

If hashes with the same :name value are always consecutive elements you can do it like that:

result = array.each_with_object([]) do |e, memo|
  if memo.last && memo.last.last[:name] == e[:name]
    memo.last << e
  else
    memo << [e] 
  end 
end

or you can use Enumerable#chunk (again, taking into account that elements with the same :name value are consecutive):

result = array.chunk{ |e| e[:name] }.map(&:last)
share|improve this answer
    
Beware that pre 1.9 Ruby, hashes are not guaranteed to be in a given order. So in that case, there wouldn't be such a thing as "always consecutive". –  Pavling Feb 2 '12 at 8:09
    
You're right, but in this particular case we're iteration over an array and hashes are just happened to be its elements. So there is nothing to worry about. I believe arrays were ordered even in the very first release of Ruby =) –  KL-7 Feb 2 '12 at 8:11
    
ah, yes! an array of hashes - sorry :-) –  Pavling Feb 2 '12 at 16:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.