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In the following C++ code, I want to use a template function to determine if two vectors are exactly the same, but, I always get false from the template function. Would you give me suggestion about how to return boolean values from a template function? (My C++ compiler is g++ 4.6)

Edit: after pop_back both p1 p2 p3 p4, the results are now matched with what I expected.

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

template<class T> bool areTheyMatched(shared_ptr<vector<T>> p1, shared_ptr<vector<T>> p2) {
if ((*p1).size() == (*p2).size()) {
    cout << (*p1).size() << endl;
    for (unsigned int i = 0;  i < (*p1).size(); i++) {
      if ((*p1)[i] != (*p2)[i]) {
        cout << (*p1)[i] << " " <<  (*p2)[i] << endl;   
        return false;
          } 
        }
 } else {
    return false;
 }
 cout << "All elements are exactly the same" << endl;
 return true;
 }


 int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
   shared_ptr<vector<int>> p1(new vector<int>);
   shared_ptr<vector<int>> p2(new vector<int>);
   shared_ptr<vector<double>> p3(new vector<double>);
   shared_ptr<vector<double>> p4(new vector<double>);
   for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) 
     (*p1).push_back(i); 
   for (int i = 0; i < 9; i++) 
     (*p2).push_back(i);
   (*p2).push_back(11);
   for (double i = 0.0; i < 9.9; i += 1.1) 
      (*p3).push_back(i);
   for (double i = 0.0; i < 8.8; i += 1.1) 
      (*p4).push_back(i);
   (*p4).push_back(11.0);
   cout << "Case 1: " << areTheyMatched(p1, p2) << endl;
   (*p1).pop_back();
   (*p2).pop_back();
   cout << "Case 2: " << areTheyMatched(p1, p2) << endl;
   cout << "Case 3: " << areTheyMatched(p3, p4) << endl;
   (*p3).pop_back();
   (*p4).pop_back();
   cout << "Case 4: " << areTheyMatched(p3, p4) << endl;
   p1.reset();
   p2.reset();
   p3.reset();
   p4.reset();
   return 0;
}
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2  
shared_ptr<vector<int>>? I'm happy you're using smart pointers instead of naked news, but I'm curious: why not vector<int>? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 2 '12 at 7:09
1  
Have you tried stepping through the code in a debugger to see why the function is returning false ? –  Paul R Feb 2 '12 at 7:11
1  
Do you know which of the return statements it is that's returning? –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 2 '12 at 7:12
2  
Change this line for (int i = 0; i < 9; i++) to for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) and you will get a true result. –  Jesse Good Feb 2 '12 at 7:15
    
I'm sorry but I had to vote down the question. If you'd just look at your inputs and debug a little, you'd find out the answer. Either way, the title of the question is not what you actually asked. –  sprite Feb 2 '12 at 14:26
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4 Answers 4

The template code seems fine, but the test vectors just never are the same, are they.

First they differ in one of them having the element 11, and when removing that they have different sizes.

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Thank you for pointing out the mistake I made! –  Gong-Yi Liao Feb 2 '12 at 13:10
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Your vectors are realy different.

   for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) 
     (*p1).push_back(i); 
   for (int i = 0; i < 9; i++) 
     (*p2).push_back(i);
   (*p2).push_back(11);

p1 = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9}
p2 = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 11}
Case 1: false
(*p2).pop_back();
p1 = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9}
p2 = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8}
Case 2: false
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Thank you for showing the detail of the two vectors! –  Gong-Yi Liao Feb 2 '12 at 13:11
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Your template function is totally fine...

The reason you're getting false is because your inputs really are different, initially in content, and after the pop even the size doesn't match.

Is there a reason why you're using shared_ptr? You could pass vector& and unless you need shared pointers for a good reason, you shouldn't use them. Although they are the best way to pass pointers around when you need to share data across many entities, they have an overhead.

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By far the biggest overhead they have is in the readability front. A side effect of the shared pointers here is the "new" that you use with it, and that's the real performance overhead. Also, one shouldn't forget that the shared pointer has a control object which is created with another "new". Aside from those, passing around shared pointers should be the same as references after the optimizations. –  enobayram Feb 3 '12 at 7:33
    
Of they are perfectly fine, but shared pointers should also be handled with care. You should always make sure you don't mistakenly hold one when you no longer need it. It could potentially cause your heap to fill (although that may take time, I've seen it happen before, and it was very hard to catch). So, smart pointers are a great thing, but still, you should use them if you need them, and not just instead of pointers everywhere, that's what you have references for. –  sprite Feb 5 '12 at 16:25
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If you instrument the code, you'll see that it works correctly. I needed to use std::tr1 and <tr1/memory> and > > instead of >> to get it to compile with G++ 4.6.1, but this shows it working:

#include <iostream>
#include <tr1/memory>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;
using namespace std::tr1;

template<class T> bool areTheyMatched(shared_ptr< vector<T> > p1, shared_ptr< vector<T> > p2)
{
    cout << "p1.size: " << (*p1).size() << ", p2.size: " << (*p2).size() << endl;
    if ((*p1).size() != (*p2).size())
        return false;
    for (unsigned int i = 0;  i < (*p1).size(); i++)
    {
        if ((*p1)[i] != (*p2)[i])
        {
            cout << "i = " << i << ": " << (*p1)[i] << " " <<  (*p2)[i] << endl;   
            return false;
        }
    }
    cout << "All elements are exactly the same" << endl;
    return true;
}

int main()
{
   shared_ptr< vector<int> > p1(new vector<int>);
   shared_ptr< vector<int> > p2(new vector<int>);
   shared_ptr< vector<double> > p3(new vector<double>);
   shared_ptr< vector<double> > p4(new vector<double>);
   for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) 
     (*p1).push_back(i); 
   for (int i = 0; i < 9; i++) 
     (*p2).push_back(i);
   (*p2).push_back(11);
   for (double i = 0.0; i < 9.9; i += 1.1) 
      (*p3).push_back(i);
   for (double i = 0.0; i < 8.8; i += 1.1) 
      (*p4).push_back(i);
   (*p4).push_back(11.0);

   cout << "Case 1: " << areTheyMatched(p1, p2) << endl;
   (*p2).pop_back();
   cout << "Case 2: " << areTheyMatched(p1, p2) << endl;
   (*p1).pop_back();
   cout << "Case 2a: " << areTheyMatched(p1, p2) << endl;

   cout << "Case 3: " << areTheyMatched(p3, p4) << endl;
   (*p3).pop_back();
   cout << "Case 4: " << areTheyMatched(p3, p4) << endl;
   (*p4).pop_back();
   cout << "Case 4a: " << areTheyMatched(p3, p4) << endl;
   p1.reset();
   p2.reset();
   p3.reset();
   p4.reset();
   return 0;
}

Output

p1.size: 10, p2.size: 10
i = 9: 9 11
Case 1: 0
p1.size: 10, p2.size: 9
Case 2: 0
p1.size: 9, p2.size: 9
All elements are exactly the same
Case 2a: 1
p1.size: 10, p2.size: 10
i = 9: 9.9 11
Case 3: 0
p1.size: 9, p2.size: 10
Case 4: 0
p1.size: 9, p2.size: 9
All elements are exactly the same
Case 4a: 1
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