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I'm looking for a library equivalent Python's "construct", maybe somebody has ported it.

Construct is a powerful declarative parser for binary data.

It is based on the concept of defining data structures in a declarative manner, rather than procedural code: Simple constructs can be combined hierarchically to form increasingly complex data structures. It's the first library that makes parsing fun, instead of the usual headache it is today.

This is similar question for java. Java equivalent of Python's "construct" library

Thanks.

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This would be a much clearer question if you explained a bit more about exactly what you wanted to do with the library (including perhaps the link that you put in a comment below). It is unlikely that there is a C library with functionality that is exactly like the Python library, but it is more likely that there is a C library that does what you want to do. –  Brooks Moses Feb 2 '12 at 7:57

2 Answers 2

You might be interested in taking a look at Protocol Buffers. This library will let you write a description of your data in an intermediate language that can be compiled to C++, Java or python.

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thank your answer. Protocol Buffers is heavy, I just want read some filesystem's field on disk. –  fengxing Feb 2 '12 at 8:04

Why yes, structs, native to C and C++. Unless you want the ability to produce structs with a set of fields that can only be determined at runtime; in this case, malloc (to allocate the memory the struct variable will need) and some memcpys (to write data to the struct variable) should do the trick.

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it function less. I'm look for code like this links mbr = Struct("mbr", HexDumpAdapter(Bytes("bootloader_code", 446)), Array(....) –  fengxing Feb 2 '12 at 7:18
    
struct mbr { char bootloader_code[446]; struct partition partitions[4]; ... } where struct partition is yet another struct with the fields defined on that page that your comment linked to earlier (and from which I got the "4" partitions) –  Etienne Perot Feb 2 '12 at 7:24
    
@EtiennePerot: From the linked code, it appears that a critical piece of the Struct object is the methods to "parse" binary input, including the ability to check for known constant values. This is very different from a static struct. –  Brooks Moses Feb 2 '12 at 7:56

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