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Like this one? http://weblogs.asp.net/dwahlin/archive/2007/09/09/c-3-0-features-object-initializers.aspx

Person p = new Person()
{
    FirstName = "John",
    LastName = "Doe",
    Address = new Address()
    {
        Street = "1234 St.",
        City = "Phoenix"
    }
};
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4 Answers 4

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Actually, there is!

Person p = new Person()
{{
    setFirstName("John");
    setLastName("Doe");
    setAddress(new Address()
    {{
        setStreet("1234 St.");
        setCity("Phoenix");
    }});
}};

or even:

Person p = new Person()
{{
    firstName = "John";
    lastName = "Doe";
    address = new Address()
    {{
        street = "1234 St.";
        city = "Phoenix";
    }});
}};

This is called double brace initialization. However I would avoid this idiom as it has some unexpected side-effects, e.g. this syntax actually creates an anonymous inner class Person$1 and Address$.

See also

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5  
Of course, that also requires that your fields are only protected. While the two forms look similar on the surface, they're really very different. –  Jon Skeet Feb 2 '12 at 7:33

If your classes have constructors that takes values for the members, you can create the instance like this:

Person p = new Person("John", "Doe", new Address("1234 St.", "Phoenix"));

If not, you have to use the setter methods after object creation.

Person p = new Person();
p.setFirstName("John");
// and so on

Take a look at the official Java tutorial.

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You can do something similar in Java with a double brace initialization block:

Person p = new Person() {{
    firstName = "John";
    lastName = "Doe";
    address = new Address() {{
        street = "1234 St.";
        city = "Phoenix";
    }};
}};

However this is just using an initialization block inside an anonymous inner class so would be less efficient than constructing the objects in the normal way.

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Others have shown the "double brace" initializers, which I think should be avoided - this isn't what inheritance is for, and it will only work as shown when the fields are directly visible to subclasses, which I'd also argue against. It's not really the same thing as C# initializer blocks. It's a hack to take advantage of a language feature designed for other purposes.

If you have more values than you wish to pass to a constructor, you might want to consider using the builder pattern:

Person person = Person.newBuilder()
    .setFirstName("John")
    .setLastName("Doe")
    .setAddress(Address.newBuilder()
        .setStreet("...")
        .setCity("Phoenix")
        .build())
    .build();

This also allows you to make Person immutable. On the other hand, doing this requires the Person class to be designed for this purpose. That's nice for autogenerated classes (it's the pattern that Protocol Buffers follows) but is annoying boiler-plate for manually-written code.

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1  
This sounds odd, but why not just chain the set functions by returning this? Then you could write new Person().setFirstName("John").setLastName("Skeet"). –  ashes999 Dec 24 '13 at 3:14
    
@ashes999: You could do - but that would be pretty odd. (It also doesn't work with immutability, of course.) –  Jon Skeet Dec 24 '13 at 9:52
    
That would be something like what C# calls a "Fluent interface," I think. I agree it would be odd, and a builder makes more sense. Thanks for the feedback. –  ashes999 Dec 24 '13 at 15:11
    
There's another drawback to the 'return this' technique- setters on base classes return an object of the base type, making setters on subclasses inaccessible without casting. You can get round this by setting properties on subclasses first, but occasionally the order's important. This shouldn't matter with well written code, but that's obviously not always the case. –  Flynn1179 Feb 18 at 22:46

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