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I'm working in django and Python and I'm having issues with saving utf-16 characters in PostgreSQL. Is there any method to convert utf-16 to utf-8 before saving?

I'm using python 2.6 here is my code snippets

sample_data="This is the time of year when  Travel & Leisure, TripAdvisor and other travel media trot out their “Best†lists, so I thought I might share my own list of outstanding hotels I’ve had the good fortune to visit over the years."

Above data contains some latin special characters but it is not showing correctly, I just want to show those latin special characters in appropriate formats.

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Why are you saving anything other than unicodes? – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Feb 2 '12 at 8:48
    
Which version of Python? Can you paste a code snippet, please? – krlmlr Feb 2 '12 at 8:49

There are no such things as "utf-16 characters". You should show your data by using print repr(data), and tell us which pieces of your data you are having trouble with. Show us the essence of your data e.g. the repr() of "Leisure “Best†lists I’ve had"

What you actually have is a string of bytes containing text encoded in UTF-8. Here is its repr():

'Leisure \xe2\x80\x9cBest\xe2\x80\x9d lists I\xe2\x80\x99ve had'

You'll notice 3 clumps of guff in what you showed. These correspond to the 3 clumps of \xhh in the repr.

Clump1 (\xe2\x80\x9c) decodes to U+201C LEFT DOUBLE QUOTATION MARK.

Clump 2 is \xe2\x80\x9d. Note that only the first 2 "latin special characters" aka "guff" showed up in your display. That is because your terminal's encoding is cp1252 which doesn't map \x9d; it just ignored it. Unicode is U+201D RIGHT DOUBLE QUOTATION MARK.

Clump 3: becomes U+2019 RIGHT SINGLE QUOTATION MARK (being used as an apostrophe).

As you have UTF-8-encoded bytes, you should be having no trouble with PostgreSQL. If you are getting errors, show your code, the full error message and the full traceback.

If you really need to display the guff to your Windows terminal, print guff.decode('utf8').encode('cp1252') ... just be prepared for unicode characters that are not supported by cp1252.

Update in response to comment I dont have any issue with saving data,problem is while displaying it is showing weired characters,so what iam thinking is convert those data before saving am i right?

Make up your mind. (1) In your question you say "I'm having issues with saving utf-16 characters in PostgreSQL". (2) Now you say "I dont have any issue with saving data,problem is while displaying it is showing weired characters"

Summary: Your sample data is encoded in UTF-8. If UTF-8 is not acceptable to PostgreSQL, decode it to Unicode. If you are having display problems, first try displaying the corresponding Unicode; if that doesn't work, try an encoding that your terminal will support (presumably one of the cp125X family.

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I dont have any issue with saving data,problem is while displaying it is showing weired characters,so what iam thinking is convert those data before saving am i right? – user1118818 Feb 2 '12 at 12:13
    
@user1118818: see my updated answer. – John Machin Feb 2 '12 at 20:13

This works for me to convert strings: sample_data.decode('mbcs').encode('utf-8')

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what is 'mbcs'? – user1118818 Feb 2 '12 at 10:02
    
Sorry, it's a name of the codec on Windows to code Chinese characters. You can replace it with utf-16 and try. – cpq Feb 2 '12 at 10:19
    
i tried with utf-16 but it is giving following error "utf16' codec can't decode byte 0x2e in position 244: truncated data" – user1118818 Feb 2 '12 at 10:38
    
@user1118818: then what you have isn't encoded in utf-16. Is your snippet posted above literally what you have in a Python file? Is the file actually encoded in utf-16, and if so, does it have the appropriate header to tell Python the source encoding? – Wooble Feb 2 '12 at 11:19
1  
-1 (1) mbcs is the generic "encoding" used in Windows for file names in ANY language, not just Chinese. (2) His data is encoded in UTF-8, not UTF-16. – John Machin Feb 2 '12 at 11:37

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