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I like to convert string with a price to a float value. The price comes from different languages and countries and can look like this:

 1,00 €
 € 1.00
 1'000,00 EUR
 1 000.00$
 1,000.00$
 1.000,00 EURO

or whatever you can think of...

Not sure I got the full range of possibilities with my examples. I am also not sure if it is possible to make in international convert blindly, maybe I have to use a language code? So for the start Euro and Dollar would be enough.

floatval() is kind of stupid so I need something more here. I think I should first remove all chars beside numbers, , and .. Then fix the , / . and use floatval finally.

Has someone done this before and can help me a little?

I would prefer a solution without regexp ;)

share|improve this question
    
why without regex? That limits you greatly... – Nick Feb 2 '12 at 10:18
1  
So the input is variable, even when dots and zeroes might mean thousands separator or decimal point.. and you think that there's a magic hammer for this, for all possible inputs you might receive from your users? – N.B. Feb 2 '12 at 10:18
    
@Nick I said "prefer" because I think regexp are hard to read and difficult to maintain. But I would still use them if I need to. – PiTheNumber Feb 2 '12 at 10:30
    
@N.B. That is the fact we are facing see here and here. And so I think others had faced this problem before. A magic hammer would be nice! – PiTheNumber Feb 2 '12 at 10:36
    
I get the issue you're having, but the problem is that you don't have the input that's constant. Sometimes you have 1,000.00 which represents a thousand. You an also have 1000.00 which is again 1 thousand. You can also have 100,00 which is a hundred (in my country we don't use the dot for decimal separator). So the question is how to interpret prices you encounter, it can vary. You need to set some ground rules, such as what's decimal separator and what's thousands separator. After that it's trivial to determine the price - skip everything that's not . or , or numeric character. – N.B. Feb 2 '12 at 12:43
up vote 11 down vote accepted

Ok, I tried it myself. What do you think of this?

function priceToFloat($s)
{
    // convert "," to "."
    $s = str_replace(',', '.', $s);

    // remove everything except numbers and dot "."
    $s = preg_replace("/[^0-9\.]/", "", $s);

    // remove all seperators from first part and keep the end
    $s = str_replace('.', '',substr($s, 0, -3)) . substr($s, -3);

    // return float
    return (float) $s;
}

Here some tests: http://codepad.org/YtiHqsgz

Sorry. I couldn't include the other functions because codepad did not like them. But I compared them and there was trouble with strings like "22 000,76" or "22.000"

Update: As Limitless isa pointed out you might have a look at the build in function money-format.

share|improve this answer
    
Seems like it should do the trick. Just out of curiosity, the filter_var approach didn't work for you? – Oldskool Feb 2 '12 at 11:28
    
@Oldskool the filter_var solutions is very nice! But it does not work for prices without cents. – PiTheNumber Feb 2 '12 at 11:39
    
You need to add the flag filter_var($price, FILTER_SANITIZE_NUMBER_FLOAT, FILTER_FLAG_ALLOW_FRACTION); – Jacob Thomason Dec 22 '14 at 5:37
    
@JacobThomason I run my tests with this function but it fails in many cases even with a simple "1,00": codepad.org/Uax6Hnar – PiTheNumber Dec 22 '14 at 9:02
    
Don't forget about negative numbers. – moorscode Oct 30 '15 at 9:54

Removing all the non-numeric characters should give you the price in cents. You can then divide that by 100 to get the 'human readable' price. You could do this with something like the filter_var FILTER_SANITIZE_NUMBER_INT. For example:

$cents = filter_var($input, FILTER_SANITIZE_NUMBER_INT);
$price = floatval($cents / 100);

Above is untested, but something like that is probably what you're looking for.

share|improve this answer

This function will fix your problem:

function priceToSQL($price)
{
    $price = preg_replace('/[^0-9\.,]*/i', '', $price);
    $price = str_replace(',', '.', $price);

    if(substr($price, -3, 1) == '.')
    {
        $price = explode('.', $price);
        $last = array_pop($price);
        $price = join($price, '').'.'.$last;
    }
    else
    {
        $price = str_replace('.', '', $price);
    }

    return $price;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! This works very nice for most cases. I still found some examples the function has problems with like "22 000,76" and "22.000". I tried to build my own version. – PiTheNumber Feb 2 '12 at 11:44
    
I fixed it with the cases you provided and it work perfectly now. – user1988125 Feb 2 '12 at 17:53
1  
+1 Works fine now. Well done! This night a good an idea, I can do the same now in three lines. Check it out. – PiTheNumber Feb 3 '12 at 7:06

To remove all but numbers, commas and full stops:

<?php

$prices = array( "1,00 €",
 "€ 1.00",
 "1'000,00 EUR",
 "1 000.99$",
 "1,000.01$",
 "1.000,10 EURO");

$new_prices = array();
foreach ($prices as $price) {
    $new_prices[] = preg_replace("/[^0-9,\.]/", "", $price);
}

print_r($new_prices);

Output:

Array ( [0] => 1,00 [1] => 1.00 [2] => 1000,00 [3] => 1000.99 [4] => 1,000.01 [5] => 1.000,10 )

Now lets utilize the parseFloat function from Michiel - php.net (I won't paste it here since it's a pretty big function):

<?php

$prices = array( "1,00 €",
 "€ 1.00",
 "1'000,00 EUR",
 "1 000.99$",
 "1,000.01$",
 "1.000,10 EURO");

$new_prices = array();
foreach ($prices as $price) {
    $new_prices[] = parseFloat(preg_replace("/[^0-9,\.]/", "", $price));
}

print_r($new_prices);

Output will be:

Array ( [0] => 1 [1] => 1 [2] => 1000 [3] => 1000.99 [4] => 1000.01 [5] => 1000.1 )
share|improve this answer
    
Nice, thank you! I tried Michiel function too but did not get it to work well. You solution has problems with "22 000,76" and "22.000". So I tried to build my own version. – PiTheNumber Feb 2 '12 at 11:43
    
The above shouldn't have any problems with "22 000,76" assuming that it means "22000.76" and not "2200076.00". However your 2nd example won't work because it's not a float. A simple check on the 3rd last character would fix that though. – Nick Feb 2 '12 at 11:55
    
Maybe I did something wrong, but parseFloat_Nick() did return some odd "0" for me. – PiTheNumber Feb 2 '12 at 12:44

price to number number to price examples

<?php

    $number="1.050,50";

    $result=str_replace(',','.',str_replace('.','',$number));
    echo $result. "<br/>";
    // 1050.50

    setlocale(LC_MONETARY, 'tr_TR');
    echo money_format('%!.2n', $result) ;
    // 1.050,50

?>
share|improve this answer
    
I added .UTF-8 to LC_MONETARY and tried my test strings but that did not work very well: codepad.org/s00IFyR5 Anyway money_format is interessting! – PiTheNumber Oct 30 '15 at 9:43

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