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How do I get my C# program to sleep for 50 milliseconds?

This might seem an easy question, but I'm having a temporary brain failure moment!

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Re-tagged to VB.NET as the answer works there as well. –  Samuel Renkert Aug 14 '09 at 21:01
    
No DrFloyd5, ; doesn't works on VB.NET, right? –  Zanoni Aug 14 '09 at 21:04
13  
If I were on the VB.Net team, I'd add ; as a comment character to the next version of the language... –  Joel Coehoorn Jan 18 '10 at 0:19
4  
I think VB programmers are bright enough to figure out the equivalent.. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Apr 7 '10 at 21:05
    
well, just to make sure, now they dont have to. –  PsychoData Feb 6 at 23:55

8 Answers 8

up vote 216 down vote accepted
System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(50);

Remember though, that doing this in the main GUI thread will block your GUI from updating (it will feel "sluggish")

Just remove the ; to make it work for VB.net as well.

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Check @Thetam answer, more comprehensive –  totto90 Jun 2 at 8:31

There are basically 3 choices for waiting in (almost) any programming language:

  1. Loose waiting
    • Executing thread blocks for given time (= does not consume processing power)
    • No processing is possible on blocked/waiting thread
    • Not so precise
  2. Tight waiting (also called tight loop)
    • processor is VERY busy for the entire waiting interval (in fact, it usually consumes 100% of one core's processing time)
    • Some actions can be performed while waiting
    • Very precise
  3. Combination of previous 2
    • It usually combines processing efficiency of 1. and preciseness + ability to do something of 2.

for 1. - Loose waiting in C#:

Thread.Sleep(numberOfMilliseconds);

However, windows thread scheduler causes acccuracy of Sleep() to be around 15ms (so Sleep can easily wait for 20ms, even if scheduled to wait just for 1ms).

for 2. - Tight waiting in C# is:

Stopwatch stopwatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
while (true)
{
    //some other processing to do possible
    if (stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds >= millisecondsToWait)
    {
        break;
    }
}

We could also use DateTime.Now or other means of time measurement, but Stopwatch is much faster (and this would really become visible in tight loop).

for 3. - Combination:

Stopwatch stopwatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
while (true)
{
    //some other processing to do STILL POSSIBLE
    if (stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds >= millisecondsToWait)
    {
        break;
    }
    Thread.Sleep(1); //so processor can rest for a while
}

This code regularly blocks thread for 1ms (or slightly more, depending on OS thread scheduling), so processor is not busy for that time of blocking and code does not consume 100% of processor's power. Other processing can still be performed in-between blocking (such as: updating of UI, handling of events or doing interaction/communication stuff).

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7  
+1 best answer here. –  JYelton Jan 11 '13 at 21:59

You can't specify an exact sleep time in Windows. You need a real-time OS for that. The best you can do is specify a minimum sleep time. Then it's up to the scheduler to wake up your thread after that. And never call .Sleep() on the GUI thread.

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Use this code

using System.Threading;
// ...
Thread.Sleep(50);
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Since now you have async/await feature, the best way to sleep for 50ms is by using Task.Delay:

async void foo()
{
    // something
    await Task.Delay(50);
}

Or if you are targeting .NET 4 (with Async CTP 3 for VS2010 or Microsoft.Bcl.Async), you must use:

async void foo()
{
    // something
    await TaskEx.Delay(50);
}

This way you won't block UI thread.

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1  
That's pretty cool! –  Jeff Bridgman Jan 25 '13 at 22:11
2  
Wow, you scrolled all the way down :D –  Toni Petrina Jan 25 '13 at 23:30
    
Sure, a good answer is always worth scrolling down for ;) +1 for async. I really should start learning to use it. –  Nolonar Jul 23 '13 at 7:42
    
can you response.flush during this delay, if it is in a loop? –  Teoman shipahi Dec 26 '13 at 17:25
    
No, you cannot. I believe there is a FlushAsync version. –  Toni Petrina Dec 26 '13 at 20:00
Thread.Sleep(50);

The thread will not be scheduled for execution by the operating system for the amount of time specified. This method changes the state of the thread to include WaitSleepJoin.

This method does not perform standard COM and SendMessage pumping. If you need to sleep on a thread that has STAThreadAttribute, but you want to perform standard COM and SendMessage pumping, consider using one of the overloads of the Join method that specifies a timeout interval.

Thread.Join
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Thread.Sleep
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For readability:

using System.Threading;
Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(50));
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2  
50 what? The sleep commands in Unix and C count seconds. –  Colonel Panic Mar 27 '13 at 1:11
14  
.NET is not Unix –  John Saunders Mar 27 '13 at 1:12

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