Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a bunch (about 20)thumbnail jpg images that I want to enlarge to a much bigger image when you click on each thumbnail. But I dont want to have so many large jpgs on my website, because that will slow down the entire site. Whats the best way to enable the user to view the thumbnail in large without making them into big jpg images? I need the enlarged image to be as big as possible, because each one has text that I want the user to be able to read easily. The link to my site is www.totalrecallsolutions.com I dont want to make them into pdf's because not everyone has a pdf viewer, and I dont want to make them download it. I also dont want to code each image onto its own webpage, even though I know that that will be able to be as big as I want, because I dont want to spend all that much time. Any other options? Thanks!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

I have a bunch (about 20)thumbnail jpg images that I want to enlarge to a much bigger image when you click on each thumbnail. But I dont want to have so many large jpgs on my website, because that will slow down the entire site.

I'm a little confused. You don't want to host the images, or you don't want them embedded? If you don't want to host them, use something like photobucket. If you don't want them directly embbeded to your page, look at javascript popup windows.

share|improve this answer
    
If I dont want them directly embedded, and I use a javascript pop up window, dont I still need to host them on my site? Having so many large images on my site will slow it down. –  user828640 Feb 2 '12 at 11:53
    
If you didn't want to host them, you could upload them to Photobucket, and link directly to the url. (I've used photobucket in the past to host images, you can get a direct link). Having the large images in your site directory shouldn't slow it down until you actually load them. Even then, a high-res png file doesn't take long to load on anything other than a slow connection. –  Adam Feb 2 '12 at 12:22
    
thanks a lot for your help. A png file is better in this case than a jpg? –  user828640 Feb 2 '12 at 12:44
    
No Worries. It's very subjective. PNG is a lossless compression format. You will get an accurate representation of the original. JPG is lossy, so the quality of the image will suffer. PNG can result in larger files if they are high res with lots of colours. Here's a quick lowdown labnol.org/software/tutorials/… –  Adam Feb 2 '12 at 12:56
    
Thanks for your help, I will check out photobucket. –  user828640 Feb 2 '12 at 19:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.