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Our current situation:

  • 1 Apache server (hosted)
  • 30 gb of data, hundreds of folders/projects
  • files are 99% html/php/js/css, with a bunch of pdf/ppt/docs etc.
  • Several developers, working from different locations, using own computers
  • Some devs have only access to certain directories (using different ftp accounts)
  • All updates are made with FTP directly, saving over old files
  • The hosting company makes basic daily/weekly backups, but access to those files requires their help

Now we know this isn't near an optimal solution. Every now and then somebody accidentally deletes working files with wrong ones etc etc.

What should we do to this:

  • All files are automatically backed up, so mistakes can be recovered easily and securely
  • Devs shouldn't have to change their workflow much, we really, really like the auto-save-to-FTP functionality of Dreamweaver & WinSCP
  • We get the new, better way of working to affect also the current files

?

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2 Answers 2

Argh!! I had to say it. :)

Your workflow assumes that mostly developers work on only certain well-defined parts of the project, right? Else, I think your current setup just won't work.

Then the first course of action could be to create separate source repositories for these separate 'projects'. I use the term project loosely to mean functionality (e.g. search), part of the website (e.g. About Us) or however else you divide up the work.

I wouldn't go with SVN. No new project should if you're starting from a clean slate. With git, I'd start with the following:

  1. Create a list of sub projects based upon folder structure (no overlapping files/folders)
  2. Commit them to separate git repositories
  3. Create a master git project and import all these git repositories as submodules into the right path
  4. Give repository-specific write permissions to the developers as before
  5. However, all them them should be able to read all repositories
  6. A single git clone of the master repository followed by the submodule init command will initialise the repository for each developer
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Yeah, argh is said here pretty often too. It seems the next thing I'm doing is googling Git for dummies. Just a quick question - with the setup you're suggesting, how does the basic developing work? Now we just save the file to the FTP server, refresh the browser and it's there. I really, really like the simplicity. –  Apeli Feb 2 '12 at 11:52
    
You would have an explicit 'git commit' step after making changes. There are UI tools that handle commit and push to remote automatically e.g. SmartGit. And I'll recommend ProGit (progit.org). Free ebook, also available in dead-tree version. –  nomadcoder Feb 2 '12 at 14:20
    
Would be interesting to know what solution you chose... –  nomadcoder Feb 9 '12 at 6:23

I haven't used GIT. I use SVN heavily. From what you describe, you definitely need a version control system. You can achieve almost all (except may be auto save) from a version control system, plus you will thank it for saving a lot of mess you might be going under with your current system.

So, lets jump to your queries:

All files are automatically backed up, so mistakes can be recovered easily 
and securely

Files in a revision system are indexed per commit (commit==save), so you can see complete history of a file. In build features like diff, help you to find exact changes made from one revision to other. You can recover accidentally deleted files. You would like (and appreciate) to learn repository structure and how it helps to ease release, spot fixes by branching the code. So, SVN covers ground here.

Creating user and setting authorization and authentication is matter of editing a text file with user-name, password, and it's realm(s).

Devs shouldn't have to change their workflow much, we really, really like the
auto-save-to-FTP functionality of Dreamweaver & WinSCP

There are a lot of plugins available for SVN for various IDE. I haven't worked in Dreamviewer but it seems working with SVN in Dreamweaver is seamless. I guess it might change your work-flow a bit, but it's a good change. In any case, you can always have things like Tortoise SVN to provide you with a great UI to work with.

We get the new, better way of working to affect also the current files

It's very easy to import files to SVN. Once you get basic SVN server running, all you need to just run svn import my/project/folder svn://svn.server.location/reponame/projectname/trunk for each project or something similar. And you get going.

What I suggest is to look into

PS: By the way, my answer is true to any modern VCS. Whatever you choose to go with will be better than what you currently have.

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