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For example

var MyClass = function(){

  var that = this;

  var my_var = "I want this";

  var another_var = "this one is easy";

  this.aPublicFunc = function(my_var){

    console.log(my_var);   // logs "I don't want this";
    console.log(another_var);  // logs "this one is easy";
    console.log(this.my_var);  // logs undefined which makes sense as the this context is the context of the calling function.
    console.log(that.my_var);  // logs undefined
  };
};

var an_object = new MyClass();
var an_object.aPublicFunc("I don't want this");
share|improve this question
1  
Why don't you just rename your second my_var? – deceze Feb 2 '12 at 12:18
1  
The answer is: You don't. Name your variables and function arguments better. – Anders Tornblad Feb 2 '12 at 12:21
2  
my_var and another_var are global variables in your examples. Global variables and local variables are not magically becoming properties of the object you created, so that.my_var does not work unless you assign it explicitly. In your example, when calling an_object.aPublicFunc(...) this refers to that as well. – Felix Kling Feb 2 '12 at 12:21
    
@deceze Because I'm curious to know if it is possible. – SystemicPlural Feb 2 '12 at 12:44
    
@Felix King. Ooops, corrected the global statements to be local. – SystemicPlural Feb 2 '12 at 12:48
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Private variables like you have with my_var are only accessible from code in the constructor and from the functions defined inside their scope (like in aPublicFunc()) when it is called. And, to access them, you have to use a normal javascript reference to them. When you define an argument to aPublicFunc() with the same name, you hide that outer scope variable and there is NO way to reach it as defined. Those private variables are not members of the object, they are variables captured in a closure. In javascript, the only way to reach variables in a closure is from code in the scope of that closure and you can only reach them if nothing has overridden their name.

Your simple solution is to change the name of the argument or the local variable to something slightly different. If you really want them to look similar, then put an underscore in front of one of them like this:

var MyClass = function(){

  var that = this;
  var _my_var = "I want this";
  var _another_var = "this one is easy";

  this.aPublicFunc = function(my_var){

    console.log(_my_var);   // logs "I want this";
    console.log(_another_var);  // logs "this one is easy";
    console.log(my_var);  // logs "I don't want this"
  };
};

var an_object = new MyClass();
var an_object.aPublicFunc("I don't want this");

or make the argument a bit more obvious like this:

var MyClass = function(){

  var that = this;
  var my_var = "I want this";
  var another_var = "this one is easy";

  this.aPublicFunc = function(new_my_var){

    console.log(my_var);   // logs "I want this";
    console.log(another_var);  // logs "this one is easy";
    console.log(new_my_var);  // logs "I don't want this"
  };
};

var an_object = new MyClass();
var an_object.aPublicFunc("I don't want this");

You can see this last one work here: http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/Jeaaz/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, for the clear explanation. – SystemicPlural Feb 15 '12 at 8:50

Don't override it. It makes the code less readable and more confusing.

share|improve this answer
    
In this case it is a setter. So it makes sense to have the same name. But I can't set it if I can't see it. – SystemicPlural Feb 2 '12 at 12:43
    
Even so, it's still confusing IMO. They do not represent the same thing, so it does make sense to call them the same thing. The parameter represents a new value/an input value, while the other my_var from the outer scope represents the old/current state of the object. Suppose you managed to read from the outside my_var, how would you know, looking at that line in isolation, whether you were reading the old/current state or the new/future state? It helps readability a lot if there is something in the name/reference that sets the two apart, e.g. newvalue, currentvalue, state.value etc. – Supr Feb 2 '12 at 13:03
    
In other languages you would use this.my_var = my_var, unfortunately here the only way to do that seems to be to make my_var public, which is what I am trying to avoid. It being private also avoids the problem with accessing it elsewhere. – SystemicPlural Feb 2 '12 at 13:37
    
You could go the state.my_var route, as in var state = {my_var:'I want this', other_var:'something'}; and accessed by state.my_var. Very readable and clear (there's never any doubt whether a variable is part of the object state or not), but forces you to type state. all the time and it is essentially the same as just using a different name/prefix. – Supr Feb 2 '12 at 14:53

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