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I have some code where I have two bool arrays a[] and b[], same size N.

it is an iterator pointing to an index of a, possibly between 0 to N-1

if( (a[*it] == 1 && index>*it) ||
    (a[index]==b[index] && a[index]==-1 && index!=0))
{
      final = !final;
}

Accourding to me, the second part of the if condition || (a[index]==b[index] && a[index]==-1 && index!=0) can never be true, because a[index] will not be equal to -1 for any index , it would be either 1 or 0. .. so I thought I can remove that part, however the result changes, for some particular conditions (I dont know the conditions, it's an online judge type site and I dont know what their testcases are).

I added another test condition just before this if part in my program,

if(a[index]==-1){
cout<<"its True";
}

but "its True" was never printed.

Why could this happen?

Edit : Adding actual code, the purpose of program is to handle queries of type

set_a INDEX VALUE

set_b INDEX VALUE

which sets corresponding index(0..n-1) to value(0 or 1) and

get_c index which prints out c[index] where C=A+B

note, INDEX is from LSB side, i am storing LSB of A and B in MSB of the array a and b

Code :

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
  int n, q;
  char c;
  bool a[100005] = {0}, b[100005] = {0};
  VanEmdeBoasTree equals;
  cin>>n;
  cin>>q;

  for(int i=0;i<n;i++){
    cin>>c;
    if(c=='1')
      a[n-i-1] = true;
  }
  for(int i=0;i<n;i++){
    cin>>c;
    if(c=='1')
      b[n-i-1] = true;
    if(a[n-i-1] == b[n-i-1]){
      equals.insert(n-i-1);
    }
  }

  string query;
  int index, val, lastval;
  for(int i=0;i<q;i++){
    cin>>query;
    cin>>index;
    if(query[4] == 'a'){
      cin>>val;
      if(a[index] != val){
        a[index] = val;
        if(val == b[index]){
          equals.insert(index);
        }else{
          equals.erase(index);
        }
      }
    }else if(query[4] == 'b'){
      cin>>val;
      if(b[index] != val){
        b[index] = val;
        if(a[index] == val){
          equals.insert(index);
        }else{
          equals.erase(index);
        }
      }
    }else if(query[4] == 'c'){
      int final = 0;
      if(index >n-1){
        if(equals.size() > 0){
          int last = (*(equals.predecessor(n+1)));
          if(a[last] == 1){
            final = 1;
          }
        }
      }else{

        if(equals.size() > 0 && index>0){
          VanEmdeBoasTree::const_iterator it = equals.predecessor(index);
          final = (a[index] + b[index])%2;
          if( (a[*it] == 1 && index>*it) || (a[index]==b[index] && a[index]==-1 && index!=0)){
            final = !final;
          }

        }else{
          final = (a[index] + b[index])%2;
        }

      }
      cout<<final;
    }
  }

  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
If a is bool[] then a[index]==-1 looks highly suspicious. –  spraff Feb 2 '12 at 13:06
    
@spraff yeah, it was actually a Typo, i accedently submitted the solution with this typo, and this led to correct answer for test case #6 whatever else i do, best i get is correct till #5 :-/ –  Pheonix Feb 2 '12 at 13:07
    
Since the boolean value for true is "not 0", -1 does count. Some implementations use -1 as a boolean value (see VARIANT_TRUE in COM) since it is all-bits-set as opposed to 0's all-bits-cleared. Then again, if it's actually a "bool", then the code is not checking what it thinks it's checking. –  Kaz Dragon Feb 2 '12 at 13:19
    
Iterators are not pointers to indices, but rather pointers into the array (or other data structure) itself. (In other words, where is the use for a pointer to an indices as opposed to just that indices?) –  Xeo Feb 2 '12 at 13:24
    
@Xeo it is the result of a find functionof a vEB tree, so *it contains the found value if its not ==vEBtree.end() –  Pheonix Feb 2 '12 at 13:33

3 Answers 3

If a is indeed a bool array, then unless you go out of bounds a[i]==-1 will always yield false. There is just no question in that. On the other hand, if you do go out of bounds, then the behavior is undefined meaning that everything can happen, including a boolean value evaluating to -1.

Also, there's a possibility that a is a BOOL array rather than bool. BOOL could be typedef'd or #defined as int.

Update: Since the OP maintains that the array is of type bool and there is absolutely no chance of overflow (let me pretend for a while that I believe him), then I should note that if a program contains a construct which leads to undefined behavior, then the behavior of the whole program is undefined, even prior to reaching the construct that exhibits undefined behavior. So, even if the a array is always indexed correctly, but some other unrelated array isn't, then it's still possible that you get garbage in a. Never expect any sort of consistency in a program with undefined behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
index never goes out of bounds, its always {0, n-1} inclusive, and the array indeed are bool and not BOOL –  Pheonix Feb 2 '12 at 13:16
    
@Phoenix: See my update –  Armen Tsirunyan Feb 2 '12 at 13:19
    
i added my whole code, can you point out the construct which leads to undefined behavior ? secondly, you can check/verify that INDEX would never go out of bounds. –  Pheonix Feb 2 '12 at 13:30
    
@Phoenix: I looked at your code and no, I cannot point to a construct which leads to undefined behavior. The only suspicious part is when you input the index and don't check its value, but I guess that the problem statement clearly states that it will not be out of bounds. Is it true? Are you sure that the index is 0-based in the input? Maybe there is undefined behavior in your class? in any case, a boolean value will never be equal to -1 unless the behavior of the program is undefined –  Armen Tsirunyan Feb 2 '12 at 13:36
    
yes, they wont give illegal INDEX values in any case. the Tree implementation is located here : keithschwarz.com/interesting/code/?dir=van-emde-boas-tree ... and yes the INDEX is 0 based. –  Pheonix Feb 2 '12 at 13:39

I would guess that sometimes one of index or '*it' is not actually in range. How a bool is stored is rather implementation dependant, but it you run off the end of the array, then it'd be quite possible to return values other than 0 or 1.

Incidentally, comparing a[*it] with 1 is not a good thing if a is a bool array. it should be just tested thus:

   if (a[*it] && something)
share|improve this answer
    
the concerned part is the one with index in the if condition, as when i remove it(everything else remains the same), some test case fails, so all i can think of is that somehow a[index]==-1 is being true, with index in bounds (that is for sure) –  Pheonix Feb 2 '12 at 13:17

You're forcing a cast from boolean to integer which is not necessary in that case. I would simply use logical operators do implement that same code.

Anyway, answering your question, it can be true.

int main(){
    bool a = -1;
    printf("a = %d\n", a);
    return 0;
}

This prints out "a = 1".

share|improve this answer
2  
how does that make a[index]==-1 true ? if -1 is casted to bool then i think it could turn out to be true, but then my TEST if condition should print its true, so probably its a[index] being casted to int .. ? –  Pheonix Feb 2 '12 at 13:21
    
Yup, i was wrong after all. Only if -1 is casted to bool will it return bool. –  ecc Feb 2 '12 at 13:31
    
@Phoenix and ecc: The past tense and past participle of cast is cast, not casted :) –  Armen Tsirunyan Feb 2 '12 at 13:50
    
Thanks :P I didn't knew that. –  ecc Feb 3 '12 at 14:19

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