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I have an app that will display Lotto Max numbers, I need to make my app generate random numbers but I need the numbers to not repeat. I have my code done and would like to change a little as possible. But any help would be awesome!

    #include <iostream> 
    #include <iomanip>
    #include <cstdlib>
    using namespace std;

    int main()
    {

    {
cout << "*** LOTTO  MAX  INSTA  PICK ***" << endl;
cout<< " " << endl << endl;
    }

     {
 cout << "Your Insta Pick Numbers" << endl;
 cout<< " " << endl << endl;
     }
 for (int counter = 1; counter <= 21; ++ counter)
{

cout << setw(1) << (1 + rand() % 49) << " ";


if (counter % 7 == 0)
        cout << endl;
}
{
    cout<< " " << endl << endl;
}


{
cout << "Your Tag Numbers" << endl;
cout<< " " << endl << endl;
    }
for (int counter = 1; counter <= 9; ++ counter)
{

cout << setw(1) << (0 + rand() % 9)<< " ";


if (counter % 9 == 0)
        cout << endl;

}
{
    cout<< " " << endl << endl;
}
{
    cout << "Thank you for playing!! please check ticket\n a year minus a day            from date of purchase" <<endl;
}
    };
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This looks like homework - please tag as such. –  Björn Pollex Feb 2 '12 at 13:31
1  
its not homework! i created this from scratch and now Im just wondering how to do it. I have tired multi things like arrays and sorts and I just cant get it too work. I am not going to tag something when its not it! –  Christina Sullivan Feb 2 '12 at 13:43
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7 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Before using the rand function, you need to seed the generator with a unique value. This is done with the srand functions. Commonly the unique number is the current time as returned by time:

srand(time(0));

Unless you manage to run the application several times in a single second, the result will be unique every time you run the application.

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While correct, it does not solve the OPs problem. –  Björn Pollex Feb 2 '12 at 13:35
    
thank you, this works, I just need it simple. I am teaching myself C++ and the book didnt explain it very well but I was able to use this! thanks –  Christina Sullivan Feb 2 '12 at 13:47
    
@ChristinaSullivan While my answer is in a way correct, it doesn't fully solve your problem, as noted by Björn Pollex. Read some of the other answers to further help you. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 2 '12 at 13:56
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If this is an homework, I'm not going to post a complete solution.

But, as a suggestion, you can store the already extracted numbers somewhere (e.g. in a sorted [*] std::vector, or in a std::map), and then, when you extract a new number, you can check if the number is already present in the container. If so, you try to extract a new number, until the extracted number is not found in the container.

[*] The fact that the vector is sorted allows fast binary search (I don't know how many numbers you are going to add; if this count is low, then simple O(N) linear search would do just fine; for bigger count, O(log(N)) binary search gives better performance).

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considering that there are only 50 different numbers, I would use a bit vector. –  Ben Feb 2 '12 at 13:37
    
I'll recommend to use std::set, not vector or map. In this class already make good search, add, delete etc. And it doesn't have duplicate keys. –  Olympian Feb 2 '12 at 14:07
    
@Olympian: there's no one size fitting all, but using std::vector as default container is good (especially for locality of data). Maybe not a problem for small number of items... –  user1149224 Feb 2 '12 at 18:53
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You need a data-structure that stores which numbers have already been drawn. When you generate a number, you look it up in that data-structure, and if it is already there, you redraw, otherwise, you add the number. An std::set<int> is a suitable data-structure for this.

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I would fill a vector of which to pick the numbers and replace the chosen number from that vector with the last number, this way every time you choose, you're guaranteed to get a unique number.

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Also reduce the range on the random number each time, so that you can't select the value swapped to the end. –  James Kanze Feb 2 '12 at 14:02
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Basically when we use any rand function it doesn't gurentee that it will always generate a unique number.So there is only one solution exist make a data structure(e.g array)store the random numbers and check the newly crated the random numbers with array.If exist then again call your random generation function.

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Let's say your app will return one of 49 numbers, let's store all the possible numbers:

int numbers[49];

Initialize them:

for( int i = 0; i < 49; i++){
    numbers[i] = i+1;
}

Store the maximum number you can get:

int max = 49;

Now the guessing algorithm:

int index = rand()%max; // Get just number inside the boundaries
int result = numbers[index]; // Store the number
max--; // Decrease maximum number you can get
numbers[index] = numbers[max]; // Move last number to place of just guessed number
numbers[max] = 0; // Erase last number

What's happening inside (on 5 numbers):

  • Lets say you have those 5 numbers: [1 2 3 4 5]
  • rand()%5 will output 2, that's numbers[2], that's number 3 (the result)
  • We cannot use 3 anymore, but we can use number 5 and short our list by 1, so move 5 to 3rd place so your array would look like: [1 2 5 4 5]
  • Erase 5 from the end [1 2 5 4 0]
  • Decrease max so we would guess only indexes 0-3 and array would seem to be [1 2 5 4]

Personal note: you can also use std:: containers for this, but it would be like hunting fly with flamethrower

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If you are using gcc you can leverage some of the libs to generate the container of numbers, scramble them, then pop the numbers out of the container, one at a time:

#include <algorithm>
#include <ext/numeric>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>


int main(int argc,const char** argv)
{
  std::vector<int>  v(21);

  __gnu_cxx::iota(v.begin(),v.end(),0);
  std::random_shuffle(v.begin(),v.end());
  while( !v.empty() ) {
    std::cout << v.back() << std::endl;
    v.pop_back();
  }
  return( 0 );
}

If you aren't using gcc, iota may be in "numeric" (as opposed to "ext/numeric"), in namespace std.

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