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I've written a program (in C#) that reads and manipulates MSIL programs that have been generated from C# programs. I had mistakenly assumed that the syntax rules for MSIL string constants are the same as for C#, but then I ran into the following situation:

This C# statement

string s = "Do you wish to send anyway?";

gets compiled into (among other MSIL statements) this

IL_0128:  ldstr      "Do you wish to send anyway\?"

I wasn't expecting the backslash that is used to escape the question mark. Now I can obviously take this backslash into account as part of my processing, but mostly out of curiosity I'd like to know if there is a list somewhere of which characters get escaped when the C# compiler converts C# constant strings to MSIL constant strings.

Thanks.

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Why are you working with string representation of CIL? Or is the escaping present in the binary too? –  svick Feb 2 '12 at 14:18
    
@svick: I've written my own obfuscation program that runs ILDAsm.exe, manipulates the MSIL source, and then runs ILAsm.exe. I have never worked with MSIL binary, but I would assume that there is no escaping there, that really wouldn't make sense. –  RenniePet Feb 2 '12 at 14:32
2  
I would think working directly with the binary would be easier. You could use the Mono Cecil library to do that. –  svick Feb 2 '12 at 15:22
1  
@RenniePet - FYI, I actually answered the question now. –  Joshua Honig Feb 2 '12 at 18:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Update

Based on experimentation using the C# compiler + ildasm.exe: perhaps the reason there is no list of escaped characters is because there are so few: precisely 6.

Going from the IL generated by ildasm, from C# programs compiled by Visual Studio 2010:

  • IL is strictly ASCII.
  • Three traditional whitespace characters are escaped
    • \t : 0x09 : (tab)
    • \n : 0x0A : (newline)
    • \r : 0x0D : (carriage return)
  • Three punctuation characters are escaped:
    • \" : 0x22 : (double quote)
    • \? : 0x3F : (question mark)
    • \\ : 0x5C : (backslash)
  • Only the following characters are included intact in literal strings 0x20 - 0x7E, (not including the three punctuation characters)
  • All other characters, including the ASCII contrl characters below 0x20 and everything from 0x7F on up, are converted to byte arrays. Or rather, any string containing any character other than the 92 literal and 6 escaped characters above, is converted to a byte array, where the bytes are the little-endian bytes of a UTF-16 string.

Example 1: ASCII above 0x7E: A simple accented é (U+00E9)

C#: Either "é" or "\u00E9" becomes (E9 byte comes first)

ldstr      bytearray (E9 00 )

Example 2: UTF-16: Summation symbol ∑ (U+2211)

C#: Either "∑" or "\u2211" becomes (11 byte comes first)

ldstr      bytearray (11 22 )

Example 3: UTF-32: Double-struck mathematical 𝔸 (U+1D538)

C#: Either "𝔸" or UTF-16 surrogate pair "\uD835\uDD38" becomes (bytes within char reversed, but double-byte chars in overall order)

ldstr      bytearray (35 D8 38 DD )

Example 4: Byte array conversion is for an entire string containing a non-Ascii character

C#: "In the last decade, the German word \"über\" has come to be used frequently in colloquial English." becomes

ldstr      bytearray (49 00 6E 00 20 00 74 00 68 00 65 00 20 00 6C 00  
                      61 00 73 00 74 00 20 00 64 00 65 00 63 00 61 00  
                      64 00 65 00 2C 00 20 00 74 00 68 00 65 00 20 00  
                      47 00 65 00 72 00 6D 00 61 00 6E 00 20 00 77 00  
                      6F 00 72 00 64 00 20 00 22 00 FC 00 62 00 65 00  
                      72 00 22 00 20 00 68 00 61 00 73 00 20 00 63 00  
                      6F 00 6D 00 65 00 20 00 74 00 6F 00 20 00 62 00  
                      65 00 20 00 75 00 73 00 65 00 64 00 20 00 66 00  
                      72 00 65 00 71 00 75 00 65 00 6E 00 74 00 6C 00  
                      79 00 20 00 69 00 6E 00 20 00 63 00 6F 00 6C 00  
                      6C 00 6F 00 71 00 75 00 69 00 61 00 6C 00 20 00  
                      45 00 6E 00 67 00 6C 00 69 00 73 00 68 00 2E 00 )

Directly, "you can't" (find a list of MSIL string escapes), but here are some helpful tidbits...

ECMA-335, which contains the strict definition of CIL, does not specify which characters must be escaped in QSTRING literals, only that they may be escaped using the backslash \ character. The most important notes are:

  • Unicode literals are presented as octals, not hexadecimal (i.e. \042, not \u0022).
  • Strings can be spread accross multiple lines using the \ character--see below

The only explicitly mentioned escapes are tab \t, linefeed \n, and octal numeric escapes. This is a bit annoying for you purposes since C# does not have an octal literal -- you'll have to do your own extraction and conversion, such as by using the Convert.ToInt32([string], 8) method.

Beyond that the choice of escapes is "implementation-specific" to the "hypothetical IL assembler" described in the spec. So your question rightly asks about the rules for MSIL, which is Microsoft's strict implementation of CIL. As far as I can tell, MS has not documented their choice of escapes. It could be helpful at least to ask the Mono folks what they use. Beyond that, it may be a matter of generating the list yourself -- make a program that declares a string literal for every character \u0000 - whatever, and see what the compiled ldstr statements are. If I get to it first, I'll be sure to post my results.

Additional notes:

To properly parse *IL string literals -- known as QSTRINGS or SQSTRINGS -- you will have to account for more than just character escapes. Take in-code string concatenation, for example (and this is verbatim from Partition II::5.2):

The "+" operator can be used to concatenate string literals. This way, a long string can be broken across multiple lines by using "+" and a new string on each line. An alternative is to use "\" as the last character in a line, in which case, that character and the line break following it are not entered into the generated string. Any white space characters (space, line-feed, carriage-return, and tab) between the "\" and the first non-white space character on the next line are ignored. [Note: To include a double quote character in a QSTRING, use an octal escape sequence. end note]

Example: The following result in strings that are equivalent to "Hello World from CIL!":

ldstr "Hello " + "World " + "from CIL!"

ldstr "Hello World\ 
       \040from CIL!"
share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't seem to answer the question about escapes, though. –  svick Feb 2 '12 at 14:20
    
Thanks for your answer. I've taken a look at the ECMA document, and it's very interesting. But I don't see anything there that requires, or even allows, the question mark character to be escaped. I guess I should just accept it as a Microsoft interpretation/implementation quirk, and stop worrying about it. –  RenniePet Feb 2 '12 at 14:28
2  
@svick You're right, I know. It just seemed too big for a plain old comment. I won't expect an "answered-the-question" check, but I believe it is still both directly relevent and helpful to the OP's issue (and for future readers) –  Joshua Honig Feb 2 '12 at 14:35
1  
@RenniePet I just made some major revisions. Still not an answer per se, but hopefully helpful. –  Joshua Honig Feb 2 '12 at 15:09
    
Thank you very much. –  RenniePet Feb 3 '12 at 3:50

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