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I'm learning java and I have made simple program that simply reads value from JTextField and saves it to file using FileOutputStream.
My question is: is it normal for data to be unreadable (using same program with FileInputStream) after restarting it? If i read it without terminating program it works fine.
How can I make data wrote to file permament?
Edit:
It seems the file is being cleaned when starting the program.
Here is the code:

public class Test extends JFrame
{
JTextField field;
JButton write;
JButton read;
File file;
FileOutputStream fOut;
FileInputStream fIn;
int x;

Test() throws IOException
{
    setAlwaysOnTop(true);
    setLayout(new BorderLayout());
    field = new JTextField(4);
    write = new JButton("Write");
    read = new JButton("Read");
    file = new File("save.txt");
    if(!file.exists())
    {
        file.createNewFile();
    }
    fOut = new FileOutputStream(file);
    fIn = new FileInputStream(file);
    add(field);
    add(write, BorderLayout.LINE_START);
    add(read, BorderLayout.LINE_END);
    setVisible(true);
    setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    setSize(160,60);
    write.addActionListener(new ActionListener()
    {
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
        {
            x = Integer.parseInt(field.getText());
            try
            {
                fOut.write(x);
                System.out.println("Saving completed.");
                fOut.flush();
            }
            catch(Exception exc)
            {
                System.out.println("Saving failed.");
            }

        }
    });
    read.addActionListener(new ActionListener() 
    {
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) 
        {
            try
            {
                x = fIn.read();
                fIn.close();
            }
            catch(Exception exc)
            {
                System.out.println("Reading failed.");
            }
        }
    });
}
public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException
{
    new Test();
}
}
share|improve this question
1  
Can we see some code? –  Marcelo Feb 2 '12 at 15:53
    
Have you opened the file and see any data there? Data should be there, it shouldn't remove on restart. Without code it is hard to tell what is going on. –  Nambari Feb 2 '12 at 15:54
    
fOut = new FileOutputStream(file); becomes fOut = new FileOutputStream(file, true); –  tartak Feb 2 '12 at 16:19
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This fOut = new FileOutputStream(file); will overwrite the file, you need to use fOut = new FileOutputStream(file, true); to append to it.

share|improve this answer
    
Then how should I make this if i want there to be only one value in the file? I don't want them to stack. –  Boblob Feb 2 '12 at 16:21
    
Open, read and close the file with the FileInputStream and then reopen it with the FileOutputStream (without appending). You could also only open it for writing when you actually do it. –  Viruzzo Feb 2 '12 at 16:26
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Make sure you flush() and close() the streams.

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3  
Just closing should flush. –  Jon Skeet Feb 2 '12 at 15:54
    
@Jon Skeet But not flushing before closing can result in some messed up error handling (with some decorators, under certain conditions). –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Feb 2 '12 at 16:07
    
@TomHawtin-tackline: In terms of if there's already an IOException, but you then try to close which in turn forces a flush, or something else? –  Jon Skeet Feb 2 '12 at 16:08
    
@Jon Skeet JDK code like this: ` public void close() throws IOException { try { flush(); } catch (IOException ignored) { }` –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Feb 2 '12 at 16:10
    
@TomHawtin-tackline: Ick, I wasn't aware of that. Nasty. –  Jon Skeet Feb 2 '12 at 16:13
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here's some code to open a file for writing .. observe the "true" parameter which means we APPEND the text at the end instead of adding it to the start. The same goes for FileOutputStream .. if you don't specify the second argument (true) you will end up with an overwritten file.

try{
  // Create file 
  FileWriter fstream = new FileWriter("out.txt",true);
  BufferedWriter out = new BufferedWriter(fstream);
  out.write("Hello Java");
  //Close the output stream
  out.close();
  }catch (IOException e){//Catch exception if any
  System.err.println("Error: " + e.getMessage());
  }
share|improve this answer
2  
Note that catching Exception isn't generally a good idea, and close() should usually be in a finally block. Oh, and this will use the platform default encoding, which is usually a bad idea too. –  Jon Skeet Feb 2 '12 at 16:09
    
true, fixed exception –  tartak Feb 2 '12 at 16:12
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