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the following code ends up with a core dump. What do I do wrong?

std::vector<int> a;
a.push_back(1);
a.push_back(4);
a.push_back(7);
std::vector<int> b;
b.push_back(2);
b.push_back(5);
b.push_back(8);
std::vector<int> c;
c.clear();


std::merge(a.begin(), a.end(), b.begin(), b.end(), c.begin());
for (it=c.begin(); it!=c.end(); ++it)
    std::cout << *it << endl;

Is there any other merging function in the stl or in boost that I could be using?

Thanks!

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4 Answers

The problem is that your c is empty because it was initialised with no elements, not to mention the unnecessary call to clear(). std::merge() takes an output iterator as its last argument. If c.begin() refers to the beginning of a std::vector that already contains enough elements, then this isn’t a problem—those elements will just be overwritten. As it is, you’re invoking undefined behaviour by writing values into memory past the end of the vector.

To ensure that c has enough space for the elements, you could do this:

c.resize(a.size() + b.size());
std::merge(a.begin(), a.end(), b.begin(), b.end(), c.begin());

However, it is more idiomatic to use a std::back_insert_iterator, an output iterator that calls push_back(). For better efficiency, you can call reserve() on the vector beforehand. This ensures that c only needs to allocate memory once, rather than as it grows during the call to std::merge(). The final solution looks like this:

#include <iterator>

// ...

c.reserve(a.size() + b.size());
std::merge(a.begin(), a.end(), b.begin(), b.end(), std::back_inserter(c));
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Your answer is correct, but I would not use the term reserve, as it means something entirely different from resize. –  Luc Touraille Feb 2 '12 at 16:04
    
Why did you choose to call the second solution “better”? I’d say the opposite since the size is known and the first variant is certainly more efficient and not really more complex than the second. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 2 '12 at 16:06
1  
@KonradRudolph: the second one is less error-prone, and more general, you may know the size in this case, but sometimes you don't. –  Fanael Feb 2 '12 at 16:08
    
@KonradRudolph: The most efficient way would be to use reserve and back_insert_iterator: no successive allocations/copies, no useless default construction (even though this is not an issue here since the elements are mere integers). –  Luc Touraille Feb 2 '12 at 16:08
2  
@Luc The back_inserter variant still has to call push_back which in turn needs to check the length (redundantly, now). I don’t know where the break-even is but I’m pretty sure that this means the reserve variant is still faster for primitive types. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 2 '12 at 16:18
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You're trying to store the results in c, which is empty, and as such, it doesn't have enough space to store them all (in fact, it doesn't have enough space to store anything). Try to use back_insert_iterator, which will push_back the elements instead:

std::merge(a.begin(), a.end(), b.begin(), b.end(), std::back_inserter(c));
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std::merge(a.begin(), a.end(), b.begin(), b.end(), std::back_inserter(c));
                                                   ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

The thing is that if you pass c.begin(), the merge function will start writing values into *c.begin(), *(c.begin() + 1) etc, which leads to undefined behavior, including core dump. You have two options here.

  • Make sure c is large enough to hold all the values that merge is going to write into it. For example, you could call c.resize(a.size()+b.size()); prior to calling merge
  • Pass an std::back_insert_iterator. The example of it is given in the beginning on my answer. Every time you do *it = x where it is a back_insert_iterator, it will push_back x into the underlying container.

Info on back insert iterator can be found here. back_inserter is just a convenience function so that you don't write a lot of template arguments.

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c isn't big enough to hold the merge. Try:

#include <iterator>
...
std::merge(a.begin(), a.end(),
           b.begin(), b.end(),
           std::back_inserter(c));
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