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I'm building out a Controller function in my Node application. For whatever reason, this is not what I think it is from within the prototyped method. I assumed (perhaps wrongly) that this would be an instance of the Controller. What am I doing wrong here?

var Controller = function(db) {
    var Model = require('../models/activities.js');
    this.model = new Model(db);
    this.async = require('async');
};

Controller.prototype.getStory = function (activity, callback) {
    console.log(this.model); // undefined
};
module.exports = Controller;
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Mike's right, if you're having trouble with things like this see Douglas Crockfords language survey: javascript.crockford.com/survey.html –  vanhelgen Feb 2 '12 at 16:08
2  
Can you post the code where you create an instance of Controller and call getStory? –  Ben Taber Feb 2 '12 at 16:18

3 Answers 3

You never construct an instance of Controller in the code you show.

module.exports = Controller;

is passing the constructor out to client modules, but to construct an instance you would have to do

module.exports = new Controller;

Alternatively, if you want other modules to create a Controller using the exports, they will have to use the new operator.

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I didn't provide sufficient context. I am calling this with the new operator elsewhere in my code. this.model is still undefined. –  Josh Smith Feb 2 '12 at 16:12
2  
@JoshSmith, can you show the code that is creating the instance, and the code that is using the instance? –  Mike Samuel Feb 2 '12 at 16:50

I advise you to read this article to understand everything related to this in JavaScript. I assume you bumped into the following issue (which I can't be sure of, since you didn't provide the code that calls getStory):

var c = new Controller();

// simple example
var f = c.getStory;
f(); // this.model will probably be undefined

// further examples (easy to bump into when working with Node.js callbacks)
setTimeout(c.getStory, 100);
fs.readFile("/etc/passwd", c.getStory);

Since you are using Node.js you can rely on Function.prototype.bind to exist (which locks the this reference).

fs.readFile("/etc/passwd", c.getStory.bind(c)) // should work
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The problem is with your first line of code:

var Controller = function(db) {
    var Model = require('../models/activities.js');
    this.model = new Model(db);
    this.async = require('async');
};

This defines a local variable, which is a function. If you are trying to create a constructor, you need to do this:

function Controller(db) {
    var Model = require('../models/activities.js');
    this.model = new Model(db);
    this.async = require('async');
};

"this" in the context below refers to the outer-most scope, since Controller wasn't a type, rather a local function.

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function x() is syntactic sugar for var x = function() (with the exception that JS interpreters will look ahead for function x() definitions). Every function can be used as a constructor independent of that. –  Marcel Jackwerth Feb 2 '12 at 16:22
    
@MarcelJackwerth That may be true, but this actually fixed the problem. Any idea as to why? –  Josh Smith Feb 2 '12 at 18:22
    
This definitely shouldn't make a difference, as @MarcelJackwerth said, so maybe you changed something else? –  loganfsmyth Feb 2 '12 at 22:25
    
This seems to be an oddity of the Node.js environment. –  Travis Parks Feb 3 '12 at 2:19

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