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At startup, I want my Java program to load a DLL that should be on the path defined by java.library.path. However, if that DLL is missing, I want my program to fall back to loading a different DLL. System.LoadLibrary throws an UnsatisfiedLinkError if it can't find the DLL file. UnsatisfiedLinkError is a subclass of Error, not of Exception. Lots of commentary suggests that it is bad practice to catch Error. Is this a case where it is okay to do something like this?

try
{
    System.loadLibrary("myLibrary");
}
catch (UnsatisfiedLinkError e)
{
    try
    {
        System.load(<a fully qualified path to my fall-back library>);
    }
    catch (UnsatisfiedLinkError e)
    {
        <report that even the fall-back library didn't load>;
    }
}
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6  
FWIW, I'd say that was perfectly acceptable - but I might put a bit of diagnostic logging in there to indicate that an attempt was being made to use the backup library –  DaveHowes Feb 2 '12 at 16:13
2  
@DaveHowes: Thanks. Agreed that actual practice would call for more informative handling. Problem stems from the fact that I don't know where loadLibary will look, so I can't use something as straightforward as File.exists to avoid the UnsatisfiedLinkError in the first place. Could probably write something based on the loadLibrary source, but I wouldn't even think twice about this as an issue if UnsatisfiedLinkError were a subclass of Exception instead of Error. Impression I get is that some folks are pretty hard-core about never catching Error. –  Stevens Miller Feb 2 '12 at 16:26
1  
Some rules are made to be broken :) –  DaveHowes Feb 2 '12 at 20:40
    
So true. But, to read what some others have said about catching Error objects, you'd think the policy against doing so would have been carved in stone tablets. –  Stevens Miller Feb 2 '12 at 20:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In this case it's perfectly acceptable. In fact it's the only way to do what you want to do.

In general it's bad practice to catch Errors because there is nothing you can do to recover from them and the application may be in an unpredictable state afterwards. For example OutOfMemoryError means you have run out of memory and there's very little you can do about it. StackOverflowError means that your call stack has grown too deep and there's not a lot you can do about that either.

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2  
Thanks! That's what I gleaned from the documentation: Error tends to mean the program can't recover. This seems like an odd Throwable to put into that category. That is, it suggests to me that UnsatisfiedLinkError isn't the right thing for loadLibrary to throw. The UnsatisfiedLinkError doc says it is, "thrown if the Java Virtual Machine cannot find an appropriate native-language definition of a method declared native," but the loadLibrary doc says it throws UnsatisfiedLinkError "if the library does not exist." Not quite the same thing, imho, since it is possible to recover in that situation. –  Stevens Miller Feb 2 '12 at 16:37
    
True, you would think that loadLibrary should throw some kind of an Exception rather than an Error. –  Joni Feb 2 '12 at 16:44
    
Joni, I'm marking your answer "accepted," since: a) it's the only one I got; b) it makes perfect sense to me; and c) I looked at your Web site and can tell right away you know what you're talking about. Thanks! –  Stevens Miller Feb 2 '12 at 22:14
    
Thank you, I try my best. –  Joni Feb 2 '12 at 22:23
    
Hmmm... interesting wrinkle just developed: I tried the above in actual practice and, when I start my code from the command line and it needs to fall back to the second try, it works. When I start it via double-click, the program runs and it informs me it will have to use the fall-back, but a number of run-time bugs show up. Here's the wrinkly bit: when I move my DLL to C:\windows\system32 and run via double-click, all those bugs go away and it runs just fine. More info when I figure it out... –  Stevens Miller Feb 3 '12 at 19:11

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