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When I run ping -c 1 -q ipaddress | awk -F"/" '{print $6}' I get a value 0.123 ($MAXTIME for that ping)

But when I try to use it (as an integer value), it fails with these:

#!/bin/bash

MAXTIME=`ping -c 1 -q 172.200.201.18 | awk -F"/" '{print $6}' | xargs`

if [ $MAXTIME > 0.4 ]
then 
  echo "ALERT ALERT ALERT - Slow time"
  echo "Actual max time $MAXTIME is greater than 0.400 ms"
  echo "Napping..."                
  sleep 10
else
  echo "Fast ping - OK"
  echo "Napping..."                
  sleep 10
fi

I get an "error" on output:

ALERT ALERT ALERT - Slow time
Actual max time 0.193 is greater than 0.400 ms
Napping...

If I change the statement to [ $MAXTIME > 0.1 ]:

ALERT ALERT ALERT - Slow time
Actual max time 0.258 is greater than 0.100 ms
Napping...

If I change the statement to [ $MAXTIME > 1 ]:

ALERT ALERT ALERT - Slow time
Actual max time 0.324 is greater than 1.000 ms
Napping...

Seems like the logic is faulty (since it always returns true) and maybe $MAXTIME is not a numeric value? How do I make it a numeric value to use in the if/then statement?

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1 Answer 1

In your code, the statement > is interpreted as a redirection. Therefore, if you have a look at your directory, you will find empty files having the filenames: 0.4, 0.1 and 1 due to your tests from your question.

For floating point values (your case)

if expr "$MAXTIME" '<' 0.4    >/dev/null

For integer values, you can also use:

if [  "$MAXTIME" -lt 4  ]    #the most portable way
if (( "$MAXTIME"   > 4 ))    #(if you use bash) this one is the most readable
if [[  $MAXTIME  -lt 4 ]]    #(if you use bash) double-quotes (") are not required

INFO: Double-quotes " prevents presence of spaces or any other special character within $MAXTIME. This can happen for example, if you script is used on a computer using another version of ping that do not behaves the same way.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that was it. A note, this outputs the boolean value to stdout so I added: if expr "$MAXTIME" '>' 0.4 >> /dev/null –  Tom Feb 2 '12 at 17:54
    
Yes @user1183817 perfect: if expr "$MAXTIME" '<' 0.4 >/dev/null to remove the expr output. ;-) Do not forget to validate my answer please. You will be able to upvote when you will have enougth points. See you. Cheers. –  olibre Feb 2 '12 at 18:01

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