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If I most commonly use the class Range in Lists, would it be a good practice to inherit the class List and move the parser algorithm to the constructor?

public class Range<T>
{
    public T From { get; set; }
    public T To { get; set; }
}

Without inheritance:

public class RangeParser
{
    public static IList<Range<int>> Parser(string range)
    {
        // parse the string and return a new list
    }
}

public class RestrictionsFoo
    {
    public static ICriterion BetweenRanges<T>(IList<Range<T>> ranges, string propertyName)
        {
            var disjunction = Restrictions.Disjunction();
            foreach (Range<T> range in ranges)
                disjunction.Add(Restrictions.Between(propertyName, range.De, range.Ate));

            return disjunction;
        }
}

With inheritance:

public class RangeCollection<T> : List<Range<T>>
{
    public RangeCollection<T>(string range)
    {
        // parse the string and load this collection
    }
}

public class RestrictionsFoo
    {
    public static ICriterion BetweenRanges<T>(RangeCollection<T> ranges, string propertyName)
        {
            var disjunction = Restrictions.Disjunction();
            foreach (var range in ranges)
                disjunction.Add(Restrictions.Between(propertyName, range.De, range.Ate));

            return disjunction;
        }
}
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1 Answer 1

The simplest solution, it seems, to have a static Parse method right in the Range< T >, provided you can have T parse itself from a string. For that I would use facilities of TypeConverter

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