Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Does python provide a way to find the children of a child process spawned using subprocess, so that I can kill them properly? If not, what is a good way of ensuring that the children of a child are killed?

share|improve this question
    
Not quite a duplicate of this (as it simply says don't invoke the shell. I'm looking for a way to get the children of spawned subprocess, the python spawned process is already being invoked directly) : stackoverflow.com/questions/2638909/… – archgoon Feb 2 '12 at 18:15
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not exactly easy, but if your application runs in Linux, you could walk through the /proc filesystem and build a list of all PIDs whose PPID (parent PID) is the same as your subprocess'.

share|improve this answer
    
Sigh. So I take it the answer is effectively no. Thank you. I'll see if I can avoid subprocess spawns (or get them killed automatically). – archgoon Feb 2 '12 at 20:54

The following applies to Unix only:

Calling os.setsid() in the child process will make it the session leader of a new session and the process group leader of a new process group. Sending a SIGTERM to the process group will send a SIGTERM to all the subprocess that this child process might have spawned.

You could do this using subprocess.Popen(..., preexec_fn=os.setsid). For example:

import signal
import os
import subprocess
import time
PIPE = subprocess.PIPE
proc = subprocess.Popen('ls -laR /', shell=True,
                        preexec_fn=os.setsid,
                        stdout=PIPE, stderr=PIPE)
time.sleep(2)
os.killpg(proc.pid, signal.SIGTERM)

Running this will show no output, but ps ax will show the subprocess and the ls -laR that it spawns are terminated.

But if you comment out

preexec_fn=os.setsid

then ps ax will show something like

% ps ax | grep "ls -la"
 5409 pts/3    S      0:00 /bin/sh -c ls -laR /
 5410 pts/3    R      0:05 ls -laR /

So without os.setsid, ls -laR and the shell that spawned it are still running. Be sure to kill them:

% kill 5409
% kill 5410
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this helped me a lot with killing a subprocess that spawned its own processes. – flinz Apr 8 at 8:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.