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I want to find the most significant bit that is set to 1. I have tried every possible way from & to ORing all of the bits from 1 to 31 and it doesn't work.

Like if 1000000 I would like to have 7.

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1  
What did you try in detail? What was the result? –  user647772 Feb 2 '12 at 18:28
    
Is this homework? –  Ted Hopp Feb 2 '12 at 18:36
    
I did all of the count += 1&(~x >> 1-31); and it gave me different numbers than what I expected I want the most significant bit that is 1 and thats it –  mkuk Feb 2 '12 at 18:36
    
How should negative numbers be treated? –  Ted Hopp Feb 2 '12 at 18:39
    
Doesn't matter I need the most significant bit that is 1 thats all. so even if I have -2 I still need the most significant bit with the 1 –  mkuk Feb 2 '12 at 18:39

9 Answers 9

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you insist on directly using bitwise operators, you can try something like this:

private int mostSignificantBit(int myInt){
  int mask = 1 << 31;
  for(int bitIndex = 31; bitIndex >= 0; bitIndex--){
    if((myInt & mask) != 0){
      return bitIndex;
    }
    mask >>>= 1;
  }
  return -1;
}

We initialize the mask to 1 << 31 because that represents a 1 followed by 31 0's. We use that value to test if index 31 (the 32nd spot) is a 1. When we and this value with myInt, we get a 0 unless the corresponding bit is set in myInt. If this is the case, we return that bitIndex. If not, then we shift the mask to the right by 1 and try again. We repeat until we run out of places to shift, in which case it means none of the bits were set (maybe you want to throw an exception here instead of returning -1).

Note that this will return the value 0 for 1 and 6 for 64 (1000000 in binary). You can adjust that if you prefer. Note also that I used the unsigned right operator rather than the signed right shift. This is because the intent here is to deal with raw bits rather than their signed interpretation, but it doesn't matter in this instance since all negative values will terminate in the first iteration of the loop before shifting occurs.

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Actually the use of the unsigned right shift operator is important. If myInt is not negative, then you'll need to shift mask and it starts off as a negative value. –  Ted Hopp Feb 2 '12 at 20:47
    
You're correct that mask will always have a leading 1 that doesn't belong if the signed right shift is used (since mask starts out as negative). However, this doesn't affect results of my implementation because when myInt is not negative, that superfluous 1-bit is always being anded with a 0 (i.e. the sign bit of myInt, which we just said was positive). –  Michael McGowan Feb 2 '12 at 21:26
    
Good point! I hadn't worked through the consequences of having leading 1s in mask, which (as you point out) are precisely nothing. –  Ted Hopp Feb 2 '12 at 23:05

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/lang/Integer.html#numberOfLeadingZeros%28int%29 You want something like 32 - Integer.numberOfLeadingZeros(value).

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no only bitwise –  mkuk Feb 2 '12 at 18:36
    
@mkuk - This should do what you want. Have you tried it? –  Ted Hopp Feb 2 '12 at 18:44

Successive approximation will minimize the iterations to five loops:

unsigned int mostSignificantBit(uint32_t val) {
  unsigned int bit = 0;

  /* 4 = log(sizeof(val) * 8) / log(2) - 1 */
  for(int r = 4; r >= 0 ; --r) {
    unsigned shift = 1 << r; /* 2^r */
    uint32_t sval = val >> shift;
    if (sval) {
        bit += shift;
        val = sval;
    }
  }
  return bit;
}
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Not the most efficient, perhaps, but this should work::

public int firstBit(int i) {
    return i < 0 ? 31 : i == 0 ? 0 : Integer.toString(i, 2).length();
}
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Though there is an answer accepted, I have another ways to share which I think is easier.

If you want to use bitwise operations, here is the way. Basically, I am right-shifting the integer until it become zero. No mask is required.

private static int mostSignificantBit(int myInt){
    int i = 0;
    while (myInt != 0) {
        ++i;
        myInt >>>= 1;
    }
    return i;
}

Another way is calculate it mathematically:

private static int mostSignificantBit(int myInt){
    if (myInt == 0) return 0;    // special handling for 0
    if (myInt < 0) return 32;    // special handling for -ve

    return (int)(Math.log(myInt)/Math.log(2)) +1;
}
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The slickest implementation I've come across - three iterations and a table lookup.

unsigned int msb32(unsigned int x)
{
    static const unsigned int bval[] =
    { 0,1,2,2,3,3,3,3,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4 };

    unsigned int base = 0;
    if (x & 0xFFFF0000) { base += 32/2; x >>= 32/2; }
    if (x & 0x0000FF00) { base += 32/4; x >>= 32/4; }
    if (x & 0x000000F0) { base += 32/8; x >>= 32/8; }
    return base + bval[x];
}
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Just use numberOfTrailingZeros(value) method of Long or Integer class.

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if( value | 0x40 ) return 7;
else if( value | 0x20 ) return 6;
else if( value | 0x10 ) return 5;
else if( value | 0x8 ) return 4;
else if( value | 0x4 ) return 3;
else if( value | 0x2 ) return 2;
else if( value | 0x1 ) return 1;
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3  
What happened to returning 8 through 31? –  Ted Hopp Feb 2 '12 at 18:38

Just to add another approach

public static int mostSignificantBit(int b) {
    for (int i = 1 << 30, j = 0; i > 0; i /= 2, j++) {
           if ((b & i) > 0) {
            return 31-j;
        }
    }
    return -1;
}
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You probably want to input an int rather than a byte. –  Michael McGowan Feb 2 '12 at 19:19
    
@MichaelMcGowan, yes thank you –  Johan Sjöberg Feb 2 '12 at 19:21
    
I don't think your starting point is correct. This code gives the same answer for Integer.MAX_VALUE as it does for negative numbers. –  Michael McGowan Feb 2 '12 at 19:26

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