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I am struggling to explain oop concepts in java.

A major tenet in oop is that objects have methods; so Object.method(); works. I am contrasting this with procedural programming in which one must do method(Object).

Is this called encapsulation?

What are the advantages of the oop way?

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4  
I don't want to be rude, but why are you explaining these concepts to anyone if you don't understand them? Or did you mean that you're struggling to understand these concepts? –  JB Nizet Feb 2 '12 at 18:43
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move this question to programmers.stackexchange.com –  jamesTheProgrammer Feb 2 '12 at 18:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the scenario Object.doSomething(), the object will have complete control over its properties which are used in the method.

But in the other call, doSomething(Object), you have to make all the properties of the object public so that they are available in the method. Which is not a safer operation.

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hmmm, what if in scenario 2 I have private properties that are accessible with getter/setters? Wouldn't they still be available?? –  Gevorg Feb 2 '12 at 19:00
    
@Gevorg They are but in getter/setter you still have control over those private properties and you will show them as you want to the outside classes. –  Ravindra Gullapalli Feb 2 '12 at 19:03

That's a big question with an answer that fills multiple books, but in short, class members have access modifiers (public, private, protected). Private members can be accessed by other class members, such as a method, but not from external functions.

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2 more advantages of OOP are re-use and polymorphism.

ReUse: If you use doSomething(Object) in one file or one program, it may work fine for that program. Now, imagine that you need to use your Object in another program. You will need to duplicate the doSomething() method in your new program (probably copy and paste it). This may work, but is bad practice and makes maintaining that logic a nightmare. If the doSomething() logic is a function inside Object then that logic "lives" with the object.

Polymorphism: Imagine another case where Object is just one of many similar types. If you take advantage of Interfaces, many objects can implement the doSomething() function to suit their specific needs.

Example:

interface ICar
{
    void doSomething();
    void getFuel();
}

class GasCar : ICar
{
    public void doSomething()
    {
        //do something a gas car would do
    }
    public void getFuel()
    {
        //logic to pull gas out of a tank
    }
}

class ElectricCar : ICar
{
    public void doSomething()
    {
        //do something an electric car would do
    }
    public void getFuel()
    {
        //logic to pull fuel out of a battery
    }
}
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OOP evangelizes encapsulation; as a result, state and behavior is encapsulated in the class representing the object. Depending on what level you the encapsulation to happen, employ either static (class level) or instance (object level) based encapsulation.

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method(Object) is a paradigm that works with data structures. Data Structures are about grouping fields of information that are semantically consistent and related (i.e. struct Person {FirstName, LastName, DateOfBirth}).

Object oriented programing is one step above data structures. In OOP, we not only group data fields that are related, but we also include functions (methods, member functions) that are related to the data (and that act on the data the correct way).

Encapsulation is about keeping part of the members private to objects. The goal is to "hide" the inner-working from the external world, and protect the object's state from "corruption", or from being assigned incorrect values. OOP languages provide several "access modifiers" that are used to specify whether a given member can be accessed by a specific category of objects (instances of child classes, classes in the same "package/namespace/library", any other class, etc.).

object.method() is usually about asking an object to perform something that may involve accessing a field that is not accessible outside of the class.

The above was to define, and explain how the concept of member function (method), and the concept of encapsulation go hand in hand.

Referrences:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Encapsulation_%28object-oriented_programming%29
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object-oriented_programming
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