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On Linux if I were to malloc(1024 * 1024 * 1024), what does malloc actually do?

I'm sure it assigns a virtual address to the allocation (by walking the free list and creating a new mapping if necessary), but does it actually create 1 GiB worth of swap pages? Or does it mprotect the address range and create the pages when you actually touch them like mmap does?

(I'm specifying Linux because the standard is silent on these kinds of details, but I'd be interested to know what other platforms do as well.)

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Interesting question; I'd be curious about the behavior on other platforms as well, but kudos for locking this question down to Linux. –  Paul Sonier May 26 '09 at 17:43

6 Answers 6

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Linux does deferred page allocation, aka. 'optimistic memory allocation'. The memory you get back from malloc is not backed by anything and when you touch it you may actually get an OOM condition (if there is no swap space for the page you request), in which case a process is unceremoniously terminated.

See for example http://www.linuxdevcenter.com/pub/a/linux/2006/11/30/linux-out-of-memory.html

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2  
It's interesting to see how the kernel calculates the "badness" of a process to figure out which process(es) to kill when running out of memory. –  JesperE May 26 '09 at 17:56
    
IIRC it has tiers: Highest to lowest - Root processes, processes performing I/O, sleeping processes ... lowest get the bullet. –  Aiden Bell May 26 '09 at 20:29
    
@Aiden The "badness" function that is used to determine which process to kill is described in the link. –  Aaron Maenpaa May 26 '09 at 20:51
    
@Aaron - oh yes :) thanks –  Aiden Bell May 26 '09 at 20:56

This http://www.win.tue.nl/~aeb/linux/lk/lk-9.html Is a good document

It contains the following programs that demonstrate Linux's handling of physical memory versus actual memory and explains the Kernel's internals.

Typically, the first demo program will get a very large amount of memory before malloc() returns NULL. The second demo program will get a much smaller amount of memory, now that earlier obtained memory is actually used. The third program will get the same large amount as the first program, and then is killed when it wants to use its memory.

Demo program 1: allocate memory without using it.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main (void) {
        int n = 0;

        while (1) {
                if (malloc(1<<20) == NULL) {
                        printf("malloc failure after %d MiB\n", n);
                        return 0;
                }
                printf ("got %d MiB\n", ++n);
        }
}

Demo program 2: allocate memory and actually touch it all.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main (void) {
        int n = 0;
        char *p;

        while (1) {
                if ((p = malloc(1<<20)) == NULL) {
                        printf("malloc failure after %d MiB\n", n);
                        return 0;
                }
                memset (p, 0, (1<<20));
                printf ("got %d MiB\n", ++n);
        }
}

Demo program 3: first allocate, and use later.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define N       10000

int main (void) {
        int i, n = 0;
        char *pp[N];

        for (n = 0; n < N; n++) {
                pp[n] = malloc(1<<20);
                if (pp[n] == NULL)
                        break;
        }
        printf("malloc failure after %d MiB\n", n);

        for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
                memset (pp[i], 0, (1<<20));
                printf("%d\n", i+1);
        }

        return 0;
}

(On a well-functioning system, like Solaris, the three demo programs obtain the same amount of memory and do not crash but see malloc() return NULL.)

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4  
"well-functioning" is a matter of opinion. In fact, Linux has options in /proc/sys/vm to control overcommit behavior. You may have it as Solaris has it if you like. –  Zan Lynx Jun 5 '09 at 2:45
1  
Be warned, /proc/sys/vm is BROKEN most of the time!! groups.google.com/group/comp.os.linux.development.system/… Here's a GOOD TIP FOR LINUX AND DISK PERFORMANCE. If your ever doing a big copy, and lots of cache is getting used up, and your I/O system start's to bog down.... echo 1 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches then presto-chango your back up to high-throughput :) go figure!! –  RandomNickName42 Jul 14 '09 at 7:01

I gave this answer to a similar post on the same subject:

Are some allocators lazy?

This starts a little off subject ( and then I'll tie it in to your question ), but what's happening is similar to what happens when you fork a process in Linux. When forking there is a mechanism called copy on write which only copies the memory space for the new process when the memory is written too. This way if the forked process exec's a new program right away then you've saved the overhead of copying the original programs memory.

Getting back to your question, the idea is similar. As others have pointed out, requesting the memory gets you the virtual memory space immediately, but the actual pages are only allocated when write to them.

What's the purpose of this? It basically makes mallocing memory a more or less constant time operation Big O(1) instead of a Big O(n) operation ( similar to the way the Linux scheduler spreads it's work out instead of doing it in one big chunk ).

To demonstrate what I mean I did the following experiment:

rbarnes@rbarnes-desktop:~/test_code$ time ./bigmalloc 

real    0m0.005s
user    0m0.000s
sys 0m0.004s
rbarnes@rbarnes-desktop:~/test_code$ time ./deadbeef 

real    0m0.558s
user    0m0.000s
sys 0m0.492s
rbarnes@rbarnes-desktop:~/test_code$ time ./justwrites 

real    0m0.006s
user    0m0.000s
sys 0m0.008s

The bigmalloc program allocates 20 million ints, but doesn't do anything with them. deadbeef writes one int to each page resulting in 19531 writes and justwrites allocates 19531 ints and zeros them out. As you can see deadbeef takes about 100 times longer to execute than bigmalloc and about 50 times longer than justwrites.

#include <stdlib.h>    

int main(int argc, char **argv) {

int *big = malloc(sizeof(int)*20000000); // allocate 80 million bytes

return 0;
}

.

#include <stdlib.h>    

int main(int argc, char **argv) {

int *big = malloc(sizeof(int)*20000000); // allocate 80 million bytes

// immediately write to each page to simulate all at once allocation

// assuming 4k page size on 32bit machine

for ( int* end = big + 20000000; big < end; big+=1024 ) *big = 0xDEADBEEF; 

return 0;

}

.

#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv) {

int *big = calloc(sizeof(int),19531); // number of writes

return 0;
}
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On Windows, the pages are committed (i.e. the free memory available goes down), but will not actually be allocated until you touch the pages (either read or write).

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on most unix-like, if manages the brk boundary. the VM adds pages when hit by the processor. at least linux and BSDs do this

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Malloc allocates memory out of blocks managed by libc. When additional memory is needed the library goes to the kernel using the brk system call.

The kernel allocates pages of virtual memory to the calling process. The pages are managed as part of resources owned by the process. Physical pages are not allocated when memory is brk'd. When the process accesses any memory location in one of the brk'd pages a page fault occurs. The kernel validates that the virtual memory has been allocated and proceeds to map a physical page to the virtual page.

Page allocation is not limited to writes and is quite distinct from copy on write. Any access, read or write, results in a page fault and mapping of a physical page.

Note that stack memory is automatically mapped. That is, an explicit brk is not required to map pages to virtual memory that is used by the stack.

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