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I have a property, as below:

public ITypeA<IType2> MyProperty {
   get {
      return new ImplementationA<ImplementationB>();
   }
}

How can I achieve this. (new ImplementationA<ImplementationB>() as ITypeA<IType2>) returns null, and casting is not allowed.

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2  
If ImplementationA<ImplementationB> implements ITypeA<IType2>, this works without a cast. If it doesn't implement it, this won't work even with a cast. I'm not seeing what the problem is you're really trying to solve. –  hvd Feb 2 '12 at 19:43

2 Answers 2

You need to declare the generic parameter of the interface to be covariant using the out keyword.

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Can you please give me an example? Please note this is C# 3.5 –  hungryMind Feb 2 '12 at 19:42
    
@hungryMind - I've added a link to the MSDN doc on the out generic modifier to SLaks answer, it contains examples. @SLaks - Hope you don't mind. –  M.Babcock Feb 2 '12 at 19:46
1  
I think generic covariance was introduced in C# 4.0. –  Roy Goode Feb 2 '12 at 19:50
2  
Roy is correct. In C# 3, this is not possible. –  SLaks Feb 2 '12 at 19:53

For .NET 3.5, I think your best option is to use a wrappr:

class ImplementationWrapper : ITypeA<IType2>
{
    public ImplementationA<ImplementationB> MyObject { get; set; }
}

public ITypeA<IType2> MyProperty {
    get {
        return new ImplementationWrapper {
            MyObject = new ImplementationA<ImplementationB>()
        };
   }
}
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