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I am performing some data validation and cleanup using Python, and I have run into a logical error in some boolean comparisons that I am performing. I have a lookup table that needs to be cleaned up, so I am comparing range values to confirm that there is no overlap between sets of values. All list values have been fed in from a CSV file.

The code:

print >>f2, "Filter logic II for " + myKey[0] + " " + myKey[1] + " "  + myKey[2] + ":"
print >>f2, "outerRow[3] " + outerRow[3] + " >= innerRow[3] " + innerRow[3] + " and outerRow[3] " + outerRow[3] + " <= innerRow[4]" + innerRow[4] + " OR outerRow[4] " + outerRow[4] + " >= innerRow[3] " + innerRow[3] + " and outerRow[4] " + outerRow[4] + " <= innerRow[4]" + innerRow[4]
if ((outerRow[3] >= innerRow[3]) and (outerRow[3] <= innerRow[4])) or ((outerRow[4] >= innerRow[3]) and (outerRow[4] <= innerRow[4])):
    Test2 = True
    print >>f2, "Filter logic II = True"
else:
    Test1 = False
    print >>f2, "Filter logic II = False"

Which yields results after the first run:

*Filter logic II for XYZ KEY123 PRE:  
outerRow[3] 0 >= innerRow[3] 80 and outerRow[3] 0 <= innerRow[4]100 OR outerRow[4] 79 >= innerRow[3] 80 and outerRow[4] 79 <= innerRow[4]100  
Filter logic II = False*

But this (unexpected) result after the second run:

*Filter logic II for 080570BD 1998 VA PRE:  
outerRow[3] 80 >= innerRow[3] 0 and outerRow[3] 80 <= innerRow[4]79 OR outerRow[4] 100 >= innerRow[3] 0 and outerRow[4] 100 <= innerRow[4]79  
Filter logic II = True*

Where am I going wrong in the logical comparison? I've stared a this a bit too long, figured I see if I could get an assist from the world wide network.

share|improve this question
2  
The example would be easier to follow if it were smaller... –  krlmlr Feb 2 '12 at 20:46
    
Why is the first example correct? 0 is less than 80. So is 79. –  recursive Feb 2 '12 at 20:49
    
Its because he is testing using strings. The given answer got it right. –  jdi Feb 2 '12 at 20:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try to convert the data into an int. This is from an interactive Python shell:

>>> "100" <= "79"
True
>>> 100 <= 79
False
>>> int("100") <= int("79")
False
share|improve this answer
2  
Yes. Just because it's not strongly typed doesn't mean it doesn't have types. –  krlmlr Feb 2 '12 at 20:47
2  
I know python has types, but it doesn't have casting. I think the right word would be "convert" (source) –  juliomalegria Feb 2 '12 at 20:48
5  
@something maybe it's not obvious, but the difference between cast and convert is huge, cast means assigning a different type to the same object, while converting creates a totally different object, you see the difference now? –  juliomalegria Feb 2 '12 at 20:55
1  
Also in C++ it's possible to create a new object when casting. Just think about cast from class type X to pointer to string. –  Johan Lundberg Feb 2 '12 at 22:37
1  
Now I'm curious: programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/133073/… :-) –  krlmlr Feb 2 '12 at 22:53

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