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I have a commandline application coded in delphi that i need to call from a normal desktop application (also coded in delphi). In short, I want to call the commandline app and display the text it outputs "live" in a listbox.

It's been ages since I have played around with the shell, but i distinctly remember that in order to grab the text from a commandline app - I have to use the pipe symbol ">". Like this:

C:/mycmdapp.exe >c:/result.txt

This will take any text printed to the shell (using writeLn) and dump it to a textfile called "result.txt".

But.. (and here comes the pickle), I want a live result rather than a backlog file. A typical example is the Delphi compiler itself - which manages to report back to the IDE what is going on. If my memory serves me correctly, I seem to recall that I must create a "pipe" channel (?), and then assign the pipe-name to the shell call.

I have tried to google this but I honestly was unsure of how to formulate it. Hopefully someone from the community can point me in the right direction.

Thank you in advance for your help

Updated: This question might be identical to How do I run a command-line program in Delphi?. Some of the answeres fit what im looking for, although the title and question itself is not identical.

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4  
Console Application Runner Classes - looks promising –  kobik Feb 2 '12 at 21:18
    
Im using Delphi XE2 (although i have most Delphi versions from Delphi 4 and up). Wasnt one of the big news earlier that Delphi 2010+ are binary compatible with XE and XE2? In that case the classes should work. Thank you so much for you feedback! –  Jon Lennart Aasenden Feb 2 '12 at 21:28
    
@Jon: No, that's incorrect. There is no binary compatibility between Delphi compiler versions (with the single exception being between D6 and D7). You can't use .dcu files compiled by D2010 with any other version of Delphi without recompiling the source. –  Ken White Feb 2 '12 at 22:39
    
Thanks for clearing it up! Dont learn if we dont ask. I could have sworn i read that somewhere - but it could be wrong. Thanks for pointing it out :) –  Jon Lennart Aasenden Feb 2 '12 at 23:10
2  
@KenWhite, wasn't it D2006 to D2007? –  Uwe Raabe Feb 3 '12 at 7:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 25 down vote accepted

As ever so often Zarco Gajic has a solution: Capture the output from a DOS (command/console) Window. This is a copy from his article for future reference:

The example runs 'chkdsk.exe c:\' and displays the output to Memo1. Put a TMemo (Memo1) and a TButton (Button1) on your form. Put this code in the OnCLick event procedure for Button1:

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject) ;

  procedure RunDosInMemo(DosApp:String;AMemo:TMemo) ;
  const
     ReadBuffer = 2400;
  var
   Security : TSecurityAttributes;
   ReadPipe,WritePipe : THandle;
   start : TStartUpInfo;
   ProcessInfo : TProcessInformation;
   Buffer : Pchar;
   BytesRead : DWord;
   Apprunning : DWord;
  begin
   With Security do begin
    nlength := SizeOf(TSecurityAttributes) ;
    binherithandle := true;
    lpsecuritydescriptor := nil;
   end;
   if Createpipe (ReadPipe, WritePipe,
                  @Security, 0) then begin
    Buffer := AllocMem(ReadBuffer + 1) ;
    FillChar(Start,Sizeof(Start),#0) ;
    start.cb := SizeOf(start) ;
    start.hStdOutput := WritePipe;
    start.hStdInput := ReadPipe;
    start.dwFlags := STARTF_USESTDHANDLES + STARTF_USESHOWWINDOW;
    start.wShowWindow := SW_HIDE;

    if CreateProcess(nil,
           PChar(DosApp),
           @Security,
           @Security,
           true,
           NORMAL_PRIORITY_CLASS,
           nil,
           nil,
           start,
           ProcessInfo)
    then
    begin
     repeat
      Apprunning := WaitForSingleObject
                   (ProcessInfo.hProcess,100) ;
      Application.ProcessMessages;
     until (Apprunning <> WAIT_TIMEOUT) ;
      Repeat
        BytesRead := 0;
        ReadFile(ReadPipe,Buffer[0], ReadBuffer,BytesRead,nil) ;
        Buffer[BytesRead]:= #0;
        OemToAnsi(Buffer,Buffer) ;
        AMemo.Text := AMemo.text + String(Buffer) ;
      until (BytesRead < ReadBuffer) ;
   end;
   FreeMem(Buffer) ;
   CloseHandle(ProcessInfo.hProcess) ;
   CloseHandle(ProcessInfo.hThread) ;
   CloseHandle(ReadPipe) ;
   CloseHandle(WritePipe) ;
   end;
  end;

  begin {button 1 code}
    RunDosInMemo('chkdsk.exe c:\',Memo1) ;
  end;

Update: The above example reads the output in one step. Here is another example from DelphiDabbler showing how the output can be read while the process is still running:

function GetDosOutput(CommandLine: string; Work: string = 'C:\'): string;
var
  SA: TSecurityAttributes;
  SI: TStartupInfo;
  PI: TProcessInformation;
  StdOutPipeRead, StdOutPipeWrite: THandle;
  WasOK: Boolean;
  Buffer: array[0..255] of AnsiChar;
  BytesRead: Cardinal;
  WorkDir: string;
  Handle: Boolean;
begin
  Result := '';
  with SA do begin
    nLength := SizeOf(SA);
    bInheritHandle := True;
    lpSecurityDescriptor := nil;
  end;
  CreatePipe(StdOutPipeRead, StdOutPipeWrite, @SA, 0);
  try
    with SI do
    begin
      FillChar(SI, SizeOf(SI), 0);
      cb := SizeOf(SI);
      dwFlags := STARTF_USESHOWWINDOW or STARTF_USESTDHANDLES;
      wShowWindow := SW_HIDE;
      hStdInput := GetStdHandle(STD_INPUT_HANDLE); // don't redirect stdin
      hStdOutput := StdOutPipeWrite;
      hStdError := StdOutPipeWrite;
    end;
    WorkDir := Work;
    Handle := CreateProcess(nil, PChar('cmd.exe /C ' + CommandLine),
                            nil, nil, True, 0, nil,
                            PChar(WorkDir), SI, PI);
    CloseHandle(StdOutPipeWrite);
    if Handle then
      try
        repeat
          WasOK := ReadFile(StdOutPipeRead, Buffer, 255, BytesRead, nil);
          if BytesRead > 0 then
          begin
            Buffer[BytesRead] := #0;
            Result := Result + Buffer;
          end;
        until not WasOK or (BytesRead = 0);
        WaitForSingleObject(PI.hProcess, INFINITE);
      finally
        CloseHandle(PI.hThread);
        CloseHandle(PI.hProcess);
      end;
  finally
    CloseHandle(StdOutPipeRead);
  end;
end;
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That is perfect! Thank you so much! I didnt think of checking delphi.about.com, exellent! –  Jon Lennart Aasenden Feb 2 '12 at 21:18
2  
@JonLennartAasenden, I added a second example showing a better approach. –  Uwe Raabe Feb 2 '12 at 21:24
    
Your the man Uwe! thanks! –  Jon Lennart Aasenden Feb 2 '12 at 23:04
    
Note that it is also possible to THandleStream rather than using ReadFile directly. This can be useful if you want more flexiblity, e.g. to copy to TMemoryStream or any other TStream descendent. Just use THandleStream.Create(StdOutPipeRead) to create the stream. –  Gerry Coll Feb 3 '12 at 3:44
    
The code above will cause problems when using unicode versionof CreateProcess: The Unicode version of this function, CreateProcessW, can modify the contents of this string. Therefore, this parameter cannot be a pointer to read-only memory (such as a const variable or a literal string). If this parameter is a constant string, the function may cause an access violation (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/…) –  iPath ツ Sep 10 '13 at 22:05

You probably have the code on your harddisk already: the Execute function in the JclSysUtils unit of the JCL (JEDI Code Library) does what you need:

function Execute(const CommandLine: string; OutputLineCallback: TTextHandler; 
  RawOutput: Boolean = False; AbortPtr: PBoolean = nil): Cardinal;

You can supply it with a callback procedure:
TTextHandler = procedure(const Text: string) of object;

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