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A co-worker came to me with a problem I thought would be trivial, but turned out to be challenging. The challenge is this: given an input string, what Unix commands can be used to print out any matching patterns within the string?

Let's say we have the following input string.

12345 4444 abc 789012 xyz 1234567 def 987654321 qrz 60606

The goal is to print out any 5-digit or 6-digit numbers within the string, but not any 4-digit or 7-digit numbers.

We first thought of using sed like so:

echo "12345 4444 abc 789012 xyz 1234567 def 987654321 qrz 60606" |
  sed 's/.*[^0-9]\{1\}\([0-9]\{5,6\}\).*/\1/g'

This command, however, only prints out the last occurrence of any matching patterns.

We finally came up with using a combination of sed and grep -Eo.

echo "12345 4444 abc 789012 xyz 1234567 def 987654321 qrz 60606" |
  sed 's/^/ /' | sed 's/$/ /' | grep -Eo '[[:space:]]+[0-9]{5,6}[[:space:]]+' |
  sed 's/ $//' | sed 's/^ //'

It works but seem a bit kludgy. Is there a better way?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about tr and grep?

echo "12345 4444 abc 789012 xyz 1234567 def 987654321 qrz 60606" |
  tr ' ' '\n' |
  grep '^[[:digit:]]\{5,6\}$'

Or as dmckee suggests, you can use the -o flag to grep to skip the tr stage (if your version of grep has this flag):

echo "12345 4444 abc 789012 xyz 1234567 def 987654321 qrz 60606" |
  grep -o '\<[[:digit:]]\{5,6\}\>'
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GNU grep at least supports -o, and I think it is in the POSIX version as well.

-o, --only-matching Show only the part of a matching line that matches PATTERN.

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worked on linux box

echo "12345 4444 abc 789012 xyz 1234567 def 987654321 qrz 60606"|egrep -o 's|[[:digit:]]{5,6} |p'
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If you want, you can actually do this using only Bash builtins, with no external utilities like tr or sed or grep:

INPUT='12345 4444 abc 789012 xyz 1234567 def 987654321 qrz 60606'
( set -f
  for word in $INPUT ; do
    if [[ $word =~ ^[0-9]{5,6}$ ]] ; then
      echo $word
    fi
  done
)

(The set -f is to disable filename-expansion, so that we can split $INPUT into its component words without having to worry that it might contain a * or something that would expand into a list of filenames. The ( ... ) is to contain the effect of the set -f, so we don't have to worry about whether the surrounding context really wants filename-expansion to be disabled.)

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Watch out for bash's =~ operator. It has some nasty corner cases. –  dmckee Feb 4 '12 at 2:21

This might work for you:

echo "12345 4444 abc 789012 xyz 1234567 def 987654321 qrz 60606" |
sed 's/\<[0-9]\{,4\}\>//g;s/\<[0-9]\{7,\}\>//g;s/[^0-9]\+/ /g'
12345 789012 60606

Or:

echo "12345 4444 abc 789012 xyz 1234567 def 987654321 qrz 60606" |
sed 'H;g;:a;s/\n\([0-9]\{5,6\}\)\> */\1 \n/;ta;s/\n[^ ]* /\n/;ta;s/..$//'
12345 789012 60606
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This filters each line, only printing out the 5 or 6 digit words, but keeping it on one line

 perl -ne 'print join(" ",grep /\b[0-9]{5,6}\b/, split)."\n";'

If input is

12345 4444 abc 789012 xyz 1234567 def 987654321 qrz 60606
hello
66666

Output is

12345 789012 60606

66666
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