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Nested “from” LINQ query expressed with extension methods

I'm sure this has been asked before, but I honestly couldn't find anything.

I'm curious what the equivalent syntax would be for the following using only built-in Linq extension methods:

var z1 =
    from x in xs
    from y in ys
    select new { x, y };

I can get the same results with this:

var z2 = xs.SelectMany(x => ys.Select(y => new { x, y }));

But it produces different IL code, and the code is a bit convoluted and hard to understand. Is there a cleaner way to do this with extension methods?


Here's my entire test method as written:

private void Test()
{
    var xs = new[] { 1D, 2D, 3D };
    var ys = new[] { 4D, 5D, 6D };

    var z1 =
        from x in xs
        from y in ys
        select new { x, y };

    var z2 = xs.SelectMany(x => ys.Select(y => new { x, y }));
}

Here's the [Edit: C# interp of the] IL code (using ILSpy):

private void Test()
{
    double[] xs = new double[]
    {
        1.0, 
        2.0, 
        3.0
    };
    double[] ys = new double[]
    {
        4.0, 
        5.0, 
        6.0
    };
    var z =
        from x in xs
        from y in ys
        select new
        {
            x = x,
            y = y
        };
    var z2 = xs.SelectMany((double x) =>
        from y in ys
        select new
        {
            x = x,
            y = y
        });
}
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marked as duplicate by Damian Leszczyński - Vash, dtb, Austin Salonen, devuxer, Joe Feb 3 '12 at 0:02

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

7  
eh, that is not il code? –  Pauli Østerø Feb 2 '12 at 21:33
1  
That looks like a C# interpretation from disassembly rather than IL. –  Roy Goode Feb 2 '12 at 21:35
4  
Eric Lippert answered pretty much the same question today here: stackoverflow.com/questions/9115675/… –  hvd Feb 2 '12 at 21:37
1  
If the result is the same, why does it matter to you how the disassembler interprets it back into C#? –  Roy Goode Feb 2 '12 at 21:40
1  
You can turn off "View > Options > Decompile query expressions" in ILSpy to see queries in extension method syntax. –  Daniel Feb 2 '12 at 21:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

One way would be:

var z2 = xs.SelectMany(x => ys, (x, y) => new {x, y});
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+1: This is probably the best solution. –  Douglas Feb 2 '12 at 21:50
    
@Magnus, this is it, +1 and thanks. I didn't realize there was an overload of SelectMany that let you do that. I have also learned, thanks to @Daniel's comment above, that I can view the extension method version rather than the query syntax in ILSpy, and it came up with basically your answer. –  devuxer Feb 2 '12 at 22:50

If you really want to use a single LINQ extension method, then another candidate would be Join, with the outerKeySelector and innerKeySelector functions defined such that they will always produce equal values.

var z3 = xs.Join(ys, x => true, y => true, (x, y) => new { x, y });

This will, however, probably give more convoluted IL code than the nested from solution. Incidentally, MSDN uses the nested from in its example for a cross join; look at the first code snippet in How to: Perform Custom Join Operations (C# Programming Guide).

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