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Assume that I have two entities as follows:

class Blog
{
    public Blog()
    {
        Posts = new HashSet<Post>();
    }

    public int Id { get; set; }
    // other properties go here

    public ICollection<Post> Posts { get; set; }
}

class Post
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    //other properties go here

    public int FKBlogId { get; set; }
    public Blog Blog { get; set; }
}

As each post belongs to a blog and each blog can have zero or more posts, the relationship is one to many.

I have not find an article, on the web, discussing whether or not we need to configure the relationship on both entities as follows.

class Context : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Blog> Blogs { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Post> Posts { get; set; }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Entity<Blog>()
            .HasMany(b => b.Posts)
            .WithRequired(p => p.Blog)
            .HasForeignKey(p => p.FKBlogId);


        modelBuilder.Entity<Post>()
            .HasRequired(p => p.Blog)
            .WithMany(b => b.Posts)
            .HasForeignKey(p => p.FKBlogId);

    }
}

Do we have to configure the relationship on both entities? In other words, does one of the following suffice?

    modelBuilder.Entity<Blog>()
        .HasMany(b => b.Posts)
        .WithRequired(p => p.Blog)
        .HasForeignKey(p => p.FKBlogId);

or

    modelBuilder.Entity<Post>()
        .HasRequired(p => p.Blog)
        .WithMany(b => b.Posts)
        .HasForeignKey(p => p.FKBlogId);

I have tested using one of them and I cannot notice any difference between them. Could you give me a confirmation whether or not my understanding is correct?

share|improve this question
    
One of the two is sufficient, which one doesn't matter. You must include .HasForeignKey(b => b.BlogId) in both mappings at the end though. – Slauma Feb 2 '12 at 22:11
1  
Yes, you are right, it's not necessary. But then your whole Fluent mapping is not necessary because conventions will detect the correct relationship. – Slauma Feb 3 '12 at 11:04
    
Ah, I see, now it's necessary :) (I had actually to test it if it's necessary or not. Somehow I had in mind that conventions are disabled as soon as you start to configure the relationship in Fluent API. But this is wrong.) Accept Fred's answer below, it's almost correct and I hope he will edit the incorrect part after your comment below. – Slauma Feb 3 '12 at 15:02
    
Decided to throw an answer now, for obvious reasons... – Slauma Feb 3 '12 at 21:21
    
@Slauma: In order to avoid getting confusion with the old version of my code snippet, I have removed my unnecessary comments pertaining to it. I will also remove this comment later. – kiss my armpit Feb 4 '12 at 10:27
up vote 1 down vote accepted

One of the two is sufficient, which one doesn't matter.

Test project (more intended for Fred Wilson), Console project with reference to EntityFramework.dll (4.1 or 4.2):

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Data.Entity;
using System.Linq;

namespace EFMappingTest
{
    class Blog
    {
        public Blog()
        {
            Posts = new HashSet<Post>();
        }

        public int Id { get; set; }
        // other properties go here

        public ICollection<Post> Posts { get; set; }
    }

    class Post
    {
        public int Id { get; set; }
        //other properties go here

        public int FKBlogId { get; set; }
        public Blog Blog { get; set; }
    }

    class Context : DbContext
    {
        public DbSet<Blog> Blogs { get; set; }
        public DbSet<Post> Posts { get; set; }

        protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
        {
            // Block 1
            modelBuilder.Entity<Blog>()
                .HasMany(b => b.Posts)
                .WithRequired(p => p.Blog)
                .HasForeignKey(p => p.FKBlogId);
            // End Block 1

            // Block 2
            modelBuilder.Entity<Post>()
                .HasRequired(p => p.Blog)
                .WithMany(b => b.Posts)
                .HasForeignKey(p => p.FKBlogId);
            // End Block 2
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            using (var context = new Context())
            {
                var blogs = context.Blogs
                    .Select(b => new
                    {
                        BlogId = b.Id,
                        Posts = b.Posts.Select(p => new
                        {
                            Id = p.Id
                        })
                    })
                    .ToList();
            }
        }
    }
}

This configuration, the configuration when commenting out "Block 2" and the configuration when commenting out "Block 1" - all three configurations create the same database schema and relationship (aside from the name of the FK constraint in the database which can be Blog_Posts or Posts_Blog).

The example query works in all three cases.

share|improve this answer
    
Keep in mind that OP's question uses `FKBlogId', which will not work as nicely with your answer. Since many databases use unconventional naming, we can't assume that OP can code to your column names. – Fred Wilson Feb 3 '12 at 22:44
    
@FredWilson: I've used the original model before he edited the question. But I've updated my answer now to the current model. It doesn't change the statement that it doesn't matter which Fluent configuration you use. How do I have to change the code to reproduce the behaviour your described, namely that the query suddenly doesn't work anymore if I comment out one of the mapping blocks? – Slauma Feb 3 '12 at 22:55
    
there was a minor difference in my fluent mappings that will take things for out of context (my apologies). Since your answer is now more correct than mine, I am removing my answer to avoid confusion. Thanks for the discussion. – Fred Wilson Feb 3 '12 at 23:25

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