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I want to be able to do a http.get request through node within my own vpn, but it seems likes the function is passing the website to a dns instead of look in my vpn. This following code works with google as the host.

http = require('http');
var host = "www.google.com";
var options = {host:host, port:80, path:'/'}

http.get( options, function( res ){
    res.setEncoding('utf8');
    res.on( 'data', function( chunk ){
          console.log( chunk );
    });
});

but when I change host to a_site_on_my_vpn.com it throws a Domain name not found error, but when i type a_site_on_my_vpn.com on firefox I am able to load the page. I guess one way I can fix this is to find out the host name's ip but is there an easier way? :D

I resolve my own answer, but to answer the question in the follow up, the answer is yes here is a snippet that shows that, by doing an DNS ip lookup then going to google by IP.

var dns = require('dns');
var http = require('http');

dns.resolve4('www.google.com', function (err, addresses) {
    if (err) throw err;

    console.log('addresses: ' + JSON.stringify(addresses));

    var options = {
    host: addresses[0]
    }

    http.get(options, function(res){
      console.log("Sending http request to google with options", options);
      var htmlsize = 0;
      res.on('data', function( chunk ){
          htmlsize+=chunk.length;
      });
      res.on('end', function(){
          console.log( "got html of lenght", htmlsize );
      });
    });
});

And this is the output

addresses: ["74.125.224.82","74.125.224.81","74.125.224.84","74.125.224.80","74.125.224.83"]
Sending http request to google with options { host: '74.125.224.82' }
got html of lenght 33431
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closed as too localized by Wesley Murch, rekire, J. Steen, Manuel, nhahtdh Mar 7 '13 at 13:22

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Just curious, if you do have Node make the request using the IP instead of hostname, does it actually work? –  Rohan Singh Feb 2 '12 at 22:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

http does resolve addresses correctly that are in a VPN, but I just had a small typo.

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