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I having some trouble figuring this problem out where I have one button which does a mass clicking of other buttons on a page. Though the issue is I don't want to activate all the buttons all at once and basically time them out until the other buttons finish their actions.

Page.MassCheckStats = function(){
        $('[data-field="button_update_stats"]').each(function(){
            $(this).click();
        });
    }

How can I get the above code to click 3 buttons at a time before going on to the other buttons.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use recursive timeouts like this:

(sorry, i forgot it was three buttons at a time);

Page.MassCheckStats = function(button){
    var button = typeof button == 'undefined'?$('[data-field="button_update_stats"]')[0] : button;
    for(var i = 0; i < 3; i++){
       $(button).click();
       if($(button).next().length == 0) return;
       button = $(button).next();
    }
    setTimeout(function(){             
       Page.MassCheckStats($(button));
    }, 1000);
}

where 1000 = 1000 miliseconds = 1 second

and here's the fiddle for it: http://jsfiddle.net/andrepadez/cR4tP/2/

the firs line inside the function is a trenary operator. it means that if you do not pass any parameter calling the function (the first time it is called), typeof button == 'undefined', so it will assign to var button the first element selected by the jQuery selector - $('[data-field="button_update_stats"]')[0]. When i call it again from the timeouts, i am passing the current $(button).next() so it will assume what was passed in the parameter.

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Hmm I clicked the click all and nothing happened. –  Novazero Feb 2 '12 at 22:46
    
wait nm it works now. Looks like this is exactly what I wanted :D thanks for your effort in teaching me this. –  Novazero Feb 2 '12 at 22:46
    
if you have any questions about the code, feel free to ask –  André Alçada Padez Feb 2 '12 at 22:48
    
Actually just for learning purposes what does this part actually do: var button = typeof button == 'undefined'?$('[data-field="button_update_stats"]')[0] : button; –  Novazero Feb 2 '12 at 22:48
1  
answer in the edit –  André Alçada Padez Feb 2 '12 at 22:53

instead of worrying about the buttons you should just call the functions assigned to each of the buttons click events

or if its the case of a certain button needing to do what the other three buttons do first, its function should contain those 3 functions

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1  
that is correct, but there are a lot of situations those functions are anonymous functions, and you really need to trigger the event... –  André Alçada Padez Feb 2 '12 at 22:41
    
Yeah, that's why tam's answer wouldn't of helped me in my situation since my functions are anonymous. –  Novazero Feb 2 '12 at 22:51

This sounds incredibly hacky, but perhaps you could attach yet another click handler.

$(document).ready(function(){
    $buttons = $('[data-field="button_update_stats"]');

    // attach your original events here

    for( var i = 0; i < $buttons.length-1; i++ ) {
        $button = $($buttons.get(i));
        $button.click(function(){$($buttons.get(i+1)).click();});
    }
}


// to start the chain
$($('[data-field="button_update_stats"]').get(0).click();

This code is completely ad-hoc and wasn't tested

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