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Using: SQL Server 2008 R2

I'd like to write a query that will select (ordered, in a single column) every second in a day in datetime format.

Ex.

2012-02-02 00:00:00
2012-02-02 00:00:01
2012-02-02 00:00:02
2012-02-02 00:00:03
2012-02-02 00:00:04
...
2012-02-02 23:59:58
2012-02-02 23:59:59

Yeah, seriously.

I can make a numbers table if need be, which might be helpful if I can convert integer values to datetime.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
I just got hit with re-captcha four times while trying to post this. Plz comment if you can see it. (sigh) – Nick Vaccaro Feb 2 '12 at 22:18
    
your post can be seen! – Akhil Feb 2 '12 at 22:19
    
You could use Recursion, but unfortunately the max recursion count in SQL Server is 100 – Akhil Feb 2 '12 at 22:21
    
This topic must be very suspect... I got hit with re-captcha when answering! – Michael Fredrickson Feb 2 '12 at 22:28
    
OPTION (MAXRECURSION 32767) is the upper limit for restricting recursion. The value zero allows unlimited recursion, or until your machine pukes. – HABO Feb 3 '12 at 2:56
up vote 6 down vote accepted

This assumes a numbers table with values up to 86,400... the number of seconds in a day.

To illustrate, I create a numbers table here... but you should do this ahead of time.

SET NOCOUNT ON

DECLARE @YourDate DATETIME
SET @YourDate = '2/2/2012'

DECLARE @Numbers TABLE (Number INT)
DECLARE @Index INT

SET @Index = 0
WHILE (@Index < 86400)
BEGIN
    INSERT INTO @Numbers VALUES (@Index)
    SET @Index = @Index + 1
END

SELECT DATEADD(SECOND, n.Number, @YourDate)
FROM @Numbers n
WHERE n.Number < 86400
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 to creating a numbers table ahead of time – AdaTheDev Feb 2 '12 at 22:32
    
Very simple, and it runs in 5 seconds. Nice. – Nick Vaccaro Feb 3 '12 at 14:51

If you don't want to rely on a table or a recursive CTEs, use a few cross joins. If you need more numbers for your sequence, just add more cross joins - you can get past a few million pretty quick.

DECLARE @start_date AS DATETIME = '2012-02-02';
WITH L0 AS (SELECT 1 AS C UNION ALL SELECT 1),       --      2
     L1 AS (SELECT L0.C FROM L0 CROSS JOIN L0 AS B), --      4
     L2 AS (SELECT L1.C FROM L1 CROSS JOIN L1 AS B), --     16
     L3 AS (SELECT L2.C FROM L2 CROSS JOIN L2 AS B), --    256
     L4 AS (SELECT L3.C FROM L3 CROSS JOIN L3 AS B), --  65536
     L5 AS (SELECT L4.C FROM L4 CROSS JOIN L4 AS B), --   Alot
      N AS (SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY L5.C) AS n FROM L5),
      D AS (SELECT DATEADD(SECOND, n - 1, @start_date) AS d, n FROM N)
SELECT d from D where n <= (60 * 60 * 24)
share|improve this answer

If you don't want to rely on another table, using a CTE, while likely more CPU intensive could be another option.

;WITH q (TimeOfDay) AS (
    SELECT  DATEADD(dd, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, GETDATE()), 0)
    UNION ALL
    SELECT  DATEADD(ss, 1, q.TimeOfDay)
    FROM    q
    WHERE   DAY(GETDATE()) = DAY(DATEADD(ss, 1, q.TimeOfDay))
)
SELECT  *
FROM    q
OPTION  (MAXRECURSION 0)
share|improve this answer
1  
I didnt know that maxrecurstion can get 0.*unlimited.) i deleted myne – Royi Namir Feb 2 '12 at 22:44

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