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So, I was given an Ada 95 program, and the assembly code that the compiler spits out. I'm having trouble understanding how the compiler/run-time environment are implementing non-local accesses. Could anybody familiar with GNU assembly help me? I have coded lots in Intel assembly and Ada 95, and understand the basic syntax of GNU assembly.

Here's the Ada program:

PROCEDURE Main_2 IS
   X : Integer := 1;
   PROCEDURE Bigsub IS
      A : Integer := 2;
            B : Integer := 3; 
            C : Integer := 4;
      PROCEDURE Sub1 IS
         A : Integer := 5; 
                  D : Integer := 6;
      BEGIN -- of Sub1
         A := B + C;  -- point 1
      END; -- of Sub1
      PROCEDURE Sub2 (X : Integer) IS
         B : Integer := 7;
                  E : Integer := 8;
         PROCEDURE Sub3 IS
            C : Integer := 9;
                        E : Integer := 10;
         BEGIN -- of Sub3
            Sub1;
            E := B + A;  -- point 2
         END; -- of Sub3
      BEGIN -- of Sub2
         Sub3;
         A := C + E; -- point 3
      END; -- Sub2
   BEGIN -- of Bigsub
      Sub2(11);
   END; -- of Bigsub
BEGIN -- of Main_2
   Bigsub;
END; -- of Main_2

Here's the assembly program:

    .file   "main_2.adb"
    .text
    .align 2
    .def    _main_2__bigsub__sub1.2238; .scl    3;  .type   32; .endef
_main_2__bigsub__sub1.2238:                                 ;;SUB_1 RIGHT HERE
LFB3:
    pushl   %ebp                                            ;;Push current frame pointer onto stack
LCFI0:
    movl    %esp, %ebp                                      ;;assign the current stack point to the current frame pointer
LCFI1:
    subl    $40, %esp                                       ;;Subtract 40 from the stack pointer, making room for 10 longs of data(frame is 10 longs long)
LCFI2:
    movl    %ecx, -28(%ebp)                                 ;;Whatever is in ECX is moved to 28 bytes ahead of the frame pointer
    movl    $5, -12(%ebp)                                   ;;Storing A in Sub1 // A = 5
    movl    $6, -16(%ebp)                                   ;;Storing B in Sub1 // B = 6
    movl    $7, -12(%ebp)                                   ;;Storing A in Sub1 // A = 3 + 4
    leave                                                   ;;Assign the current frame pointer to the current stack pointer. Pop the old frame pointer
LCFI3:
    ret                                                     ;;Returning from SUB_1. Pops the return address off and jumps to it.
LFE3:
    .align 2
    .def    _main_2__bigsub.2231;   .scl    3;  .type   32; .endef
_main_2__bigsub.2231:                                       ;;BIG SUB RIGHT HERE
LFB2:
    pushl   %ebp                                            ;;Push current frame pointer onto stack
LCFI4:
    movl    %esp, %ebp                                      ;;Assign the current stack point to the current frame pointer
LCFI5:
    subl    $56, %esp                                       ;;Subtract 56 from the stack pointer, making room for 14 longs of data(frame is 14 longs long)
LCFI6:
    movl    %ecx, -28(%ebp)                                 ;;Whatever is in the ecx is moved to 28 bytes ahead of the frame pointer
    movl    $2, -20(%ebp)                                   ;;Storing A in BIGSUB // A = 2
    movl    $3, -12(%ebp)                                   ;;Storing B in BIGSUB
    movl    $4, -16(%ebp)                                   ;;Storing C in BIGSUB
    leal    -20(%ebp), %eax                                 ;;Saves the address 20 bytes deep into the frame, and loads it into the EAX
    movl    $11, (%esp)                                     ;;Putting x on top of the stack for sub2
    movl    %eax, %ecx                                      ;;Stores the address 20 bytes deep into the stack frame in the ECX
    call    _main_2__bigsub__sub2.2241                      ;;calling sub2 from bigsub
    leave                                                   ;;Assign the current frame pointer to the current stack pointer. Pop the old frame pointer
LCFI7:
    ret                                                     ;;Returning from BIGSUB. Pops the return address off and jumps to it.
LFE2:
    .align 2
.globl __ada_main_2                                         ;;MAIN_2 RIGHT HERE
    .def    __ada_main_2;   .scl    2;  .type   32; .endef
__ada_main_2:
LFB1:
    pushl   %ebp                                            ;;Push current frame pointer onto the stack
LCFI8:
    movl    %esp, %ebp                                      ;;Assign the current stack pointer to the current frame pointer
LCFI9:
    subl    $24, %esp                                       ;;Subtract 24 from the stack pointer, making room for 6 longs of data(frame is 6 longs long)
LCFI10:
    movl    $1, -12(%ebp)                                   ;;Storing x in Main_2
    leal    -12(%ebp), %eax                                 ;;Saves the address 12 bytes deep into the frame, and loads it into the EAX
    movl    %eax, %ecx                                      ;;Stores the address 12 bytes deep into the stack frame in the ECX
    call    _main_2__bigsub.2231                            ;;calling bigsub from main_2
    leave                                                   ;;Assign the current frame pointer to the current stack pointer. Pop the old frame pointer
LCFI11:
    ret                                                     ;;Returning from MAIN_2. Pops the return address off and jumps to it.
LFE1:
    .align 2
    .def    _main_2__bigsub__sub2__sub3.2250;   .scl    3;  .type   32; .endef
_main_2__bigsub__sub2__sub3.2250:                           ;;SUB_3 RIGHT HERE
LFB5:
    pushl   %ebp                                            ;;Push current frame pointer onto the stack
LCFI12:
    movl    %esp, %ebp                                      ;;Assign the current stack pointer to the current frame pointer
LCFI13:
    pushl   %ebx                                            ;;push whatever is in the EBX onto the stack
LCFI14:
    subl    $36, %esp                                       ;;Subtract 36 from the stack pointer, making room for 9 longs of data(frame is 9 longs long)
LCFI15:
    movl    %ecx, %ebx                                      ;;Whatever is in the ecx is moved to the ebx for storage
    movl    %ecx, -28(%ebp)                                 ;;Whatever is in the ecx is moved to the address 28 deep into the frame
    movl    $9, -12(%ebp)                                   ;;Storing C in Sub3 // C = 9
    movl    $10, -16(%ebp)                                  ;;Storing E in Sub3 // E = 10
    movl    (%ebx), %eax                                    ;;The contents of the address in the EBX is moved to the EAX
    movl    %eax, %ecx                                      ;;The contents of the EAX is moved to the ECX
    call    _main_2__bigsub__sub1.2238                      ;;calling sub1 from sub3
    movl    (%ebx), %eax                                    ;;The contents of the address in the EBX is moved to the EAX
    movl    (%eax), %eax                                    ;;The contents of the address in the EAX is moved to the EAX
    addl    $7, %eax                                        ;;Adding 7 and 2, and storing it in the EAX
    movl    %eax, -16(%ebp)                                 ;;Move the contents of the EAX to the address 16 bytes deep into the current frame
    addl    $36, %esp                                       ;;add 36 back to the stack pointer, erasing what was the current frame
    popl    %ebx                                            ;;Pop whatever used to be in EBX back into EBX
LCFI16:
    popl    %ebp                                            ;;Pop the old frame pointer back into EBP
LCFI17:
    ret                                                     ;;Pop the return address off the stack and jump to it
LFE5:
    .align 2
    .def    _main_2__bigsub__sub2.2241; .scl    3;  .type   32; .endef
_main_2__bigsub__sub2.2241:                                 ;;SUB_2 RIGHT HERE
LFB4:
    pushl   %ebp                                            ;;Push the old frame pointer onto the stack
LCFI18:
    movl    %esp, %ebp                                      ;;Assign the current stack pointer to the current frame pointer
LCFI19:
    pushl   %ebx                                            ;;Push Whatever is in the EBX onto the stack
LCFI20:
    subl    $36, %esp                                       ;;Subtract 36 from the stack pointer, making room for 9 longs of data(frame is 9 longs long)
LCFI21:
    movl    %ecx, %ebx                                      ;;Move whatever is in the ECX to the EBX
    movl    %ecx, -28(%ebp)                                 ;;Whatever is in the ECX is assigned to the address 28 bytes deep into the current frame
    movl    %ebx, -20(%ebp)                                 ;;Assign the contents of EBX to 20 deep into the stack frame
    movl    $7, -12(%ebp)                                   ;;Storing B in Sub2 // B = 7
    movl    $8, -16(%ebp)                                   ;;Storing E in Sub2 // E = 8
    leal    -20(%ebp), %eax                                 ;;Saves the address 20 bytes deep into the frame, and loads it into the EAX
    movl    %eax, %ecx                                      ;;Assign the contents of the EAX to the ECX
    call    _main_2__bigsub__sub2__sub3.2250                ;;calling sub3 from sub2
    movl    $12, (%ebx)                                     ;;Assigning 12 to A in Sub2, A is the address held within the EBX
    addl    $36, %esp                                       ;;Add 36 back into the stack pointer, erasing what was the current frame
    popl    %ebx                                            ;;Pop whatever used to be in the EBX back into the EBX
LCFI22:
    popl    %ebp                                            ;;Pop the old frame pointer back into EBP
LCFI23:
    ret                                                     ;;Pop the return address off the stack and jump to it

If I need to clear anything up just ask :)

share|improve this question
    
Couldn't figure out how to format the code so I posted links to pastebin, hope this is ok. Thanks –  robins35 Feb 2 '12 at 22:21
2  
It's not really OK. Why don't you try to format it? There are instructions right there on the page you used to submit your question. –  Carl Norum Feb 2 '12 at 22:50
    
I tried, I hit control k, and then pasted my code. It only included the first few lines, and then it crammed all the code together on a single line. What am I doing wrong here? I also tried to manually indent it both 4 and 8 spaces, but to no avail. –  robins35 Feb 2 '12 at 23:27
2  
To format code, paste it into your question, highlight it, then click the {} icon. I've done this for your Ada code; the assembly listing is bigger, but you might consider putting into the question anyway. –  Keith Thompson Feb 3 '12 at 0:12
1  
When you say GNU assembly do you mean something like "x86 assembly generated by the GNU compiler"? –  Stephen P Feb 3 '12 at 1:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Looks like the outer routine is passing a reference to the local stack frame to the called routine in ECX. But please post a shorter example since this one is hard to follow - some of the math performed in the source appears to be expanded in line by the compiler.

share|improve this answer
    
What do you suggest I post? I'm pretty lost by this. Maybe you can help me here. I'm confused why the first function in the assembly program is Sub1, even though it should be Main_2. I went ahead and commented everything that I understood. I'll post that soon. Do you know what all the code is for after Sub2 returns? It just seems like a bunch of values stored. Is it anything I need to worry about? Thanks a bunch. –  robins35 Feb 3 '12 at 1:09
1  
That code after sub2 does look very strange. It's like the compiler is emitting part of the code as constant declarations, or something, but I'm not intimately familiar with AT&T syntax. That's why I wanted you to cut down the sample a bit. What's your interest in this - does the generated code not work the way it was intended? –  500 - Internal Server Error Feb 3 '12 at 1:18
1  
Right. The "leal -20(%ebp), %eax" statement, or in its readable form :) "lea eax, ebp-20" loads the address of the current stack frame into eax, it's then copied to ecx a few instructions later, and then the sub-routine is called. It then uses that pointer to retrieve values from the calling scope. And yes, the compiler does some of the additions at compile-time. –  500 - Internal Server Error Feb 3 '12 at 1:32
1  
Not random. The compiler calculates the base of the 'display window' on the variables that the nested routine will need. In _main_2__bigsub.2231, for example, the variable A is right at ebp-20 and the rest are further up in the window. –  500 - Internal Server Error Feb 3 '12 at 1:51
2  
I think I'm done looking at this code for now, but compilers that support this feature generally build a linked of stack frames on stack for this purpose. –  500 - Internal Server Error Feb 3 '12 at 2:00

Follow the ECX register. If you notice the instruction leal, the address of the each scope's reference frame, which is being used as an offset for those locals, is pulled and stored each time before a function call.

That's probably enough for Meehan to give you credit

share|improve this answer
    
Didn't realize it was this obvious that it was a Meehan assignment, haha. After the ridiculous tests, I somehow managed an A in that class. –  robins35 Mar 27 '12 at 18:12

-- NOT AN ANSWER --

You can simplify your commenting by using the END PROCEDURE_NAME; form of coding,

  PROCEDURE Sub1 IS
     A : Integer := 5; 
              D : Integer := 6;
  BEGIN -- of Sub1
     A := B + C;  -- point 1
  END; -- of Sub1

Becomes:

  PROCEDURE Sub1 IS
     A : Integer := 5; 
              D : Integer := 6;
  BEGIN -- of Sub1
     A := B + C;  -- point 1
  END Sub1;

It's one thing that I find very nice about Ada as compared to the "curly-brace" languages.

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