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I have two interfaces that declare functions with the same name but incompatible signatures:

interface IDog 
{
    function bark() : void;
}

interface IAdvancedDog
{
    function bark(volume : Number) : void;
}

I need to implement both in the same class, something like the following:

class AlphaDog implements IDog, IAdvancedDog
{
     public function bark() : void
     {
     }

     public function bark(volume : Number) : void
     {
     }
}

This, of course, doesn't work. Is there a way to disambiguate bark() functions in this case? C#, for example, allows an explicit interface marker:

   class AlphaDog : IDog, IAdvancedDog
   {
       // ...
       void IDog.bark() { } 
   }

Although this won't be required in C# due to function overloading rules. There's no overloading in AS3, so is there any other way to resolve this?

UPDATE.

1) Missing 'public' qualifiers in the class definition were a typo. I fixed it.

2) I missed an additional requirement that interfaces CAN'T be modified (for the purpose of this question). In the real project they're defined in two different libraries that are a part of a large project. Multiple classes implement both interfaces (separately). So, any changes of interfaces will require cascading updates of all those classes, recompilation, testing, etc. So, I wanted first to find out if there was a solution without such intrusive modifications. It doesn't seem there is.

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2 Answers 2

ActionScript 3 does not support function overloading like this. Plus the fact that you did not define if the functions as public you will get compile errors.

What you can do in your case is add a default of NaN and only have one interface.

package{
  public class AlphaDog implements IDog
    {
         public function bark(volume : Number = NaN) : void
         {
         }
    }
}


package{
    interface IDog
    {
        function bark(volume : Number = NaN) : void;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I actually just tested it if you do not have public it will not even compile. Even setting to protected will not let it compile. –  The_asMan Feb 2 '12 at 23:56
    
So did I :) Here's your +1! –  weltraumpirat Feb 3 '12 at 0:00
    
Thanks everyone for answers and comments! I updated my post to reflect that the missing 'public' was a typo, and added the assumption that interfaces CAN'T be modified. It seems the conclusion is it's impossible to resolve this collision in AS3 without modifying interfaces or using a completely different solution. –  Alex Feb 4 '12 at 0:57
    
@Alex interfaces must reflect the class(s) that implement them. With that being said yes you are right. It is impossible because for whatever reason you do not want to change the interface and add the default value. I am curious though as to why your implementing the same interface across multiple classes/libraries? For lack of better words a library should be self contained. Also curious as to what action you took to fix your issue. –  The_asMan Mar 22 '12 at 22:46
    
@The_asMan We have a couple of video-related apps developed semi-independently. Both ended up with their own implementations of the video player object. I wanted to consolidate them, but change as little code as possible. The simplest way was to keep one implementation that supported two interfaces, one for each app. Interfaces were similar, but not identical. Hence, my question. Since that wasn't possible, I resolved the issue by having two clases: RealDog has the implementation and implements IDog, and AdvancedDog implements IAdvancedDog and forwards all calls to RealDog. –  Alex Apr 29 '12 at 19:29

The_asMan's answer I think is more or less the best answer as well as the right one for this question. My answer is more of an alternative approach that may be scrutinized, but I think its worth posting(don't downvote me too bad :( ).

You could define the volume not as a parameter for the bark() method but as a property in your interface. This is where you say "but you cant define a property in an interface -_-", which is true, so you can use the next best thing, getter and setter method definitions. Here's an example I made:

    package 
    {
        import flash.display.Sprite;
        import flash.events.Event;

        public class Main extends Sprite 
        {

            public function Main():void 
            {
                if (stage) init();
                else addEventListener(Event.ADDED_TO_STAGE, init);
            }

            private function init(e:Event = null):void 
            {
                removeEventListener(Event.ADDED_TO_STAGE, init);

                var strayDog:IDog = new StrayDog();
                var alphaDog:IDog = new AlphaDog();

                strayDog.bark(); // output: Bark!
                alphaDog.bark(); // output: Bark!

                (alphaDog as IAdvancedDog).volume = 1; // output: set volume to 1

                alphaDog.bark(); // output: Bark!!!

            }// end function

        }// end class

    }// end package

    internal interface IDog
    {
        function bark():void

    }// end interface

    internal interface IAdvancedDog extends IDog
    {
        function get volume():Number
        function set volume(value:Number):void

    }// end interface

    internal class StrayDog implements IDog
    {
        public function StrayDog() {}

        public function bark():void
        {
            trace("Bark!");

        }// end function

    }// end class

    internal class AlphaDog implements IAdvancedDog
    {
        private var _volume:Number = 0.5;

        public function AlphaDog() {}

        public function get volume():Number
        {
            return _volume;

        }// end function

        public function set volume(value:Number):void
        {
            if (value <0 || value > 1) 
            throw new Error("Error: Volume must be between 0 and 1.");

            trace("setting volume to " + value);

            _volume = value;

        }// end function

        public function bark():void
        {
            if (volume <= 0) trace("...")
            else if (volume > 0 && volume <= 0.5) trace("Bark!")
            else if (volume > 0.5) trace("BARK!!!");

        }// end function

    }// end class

It's just an idea, but I would go with The_asMan's answer, this one might be wrong.

[UPDATE]

Another approach:

package 
{
    import flash.display.GraphicsGradientFill;
    import flash.display.Sprite;
    import flash.events.Event;

    public class Main extends Sprite 
    {
        public function Main():void 
        {
            if (stage) init();
            else addEventListener(Event.ADDED_TO_STAGE, init);

        }// end function

        private function init(e:Event = null):void 
        {
            removeEventListener(Event.ADDED_TO_STAGE, init);

            var strayDog:IDog = new StrayDog();
            var alphaDog:IDog = new AlphaDog();
            var supremeDog:IDog = new SupremeDog();

            strayDog.bark(); // output: Bark!
            alphaDog.bark(); // output: Bark!
            alphaDog.bark( { volume : 1 } ); // output: BARK!!!
            supremeDog.bark(); // output: Bark!
            supremeDog.bark( { volume : 1 } ); // output: BARK!!!
            supremeDog.bark( { length : 3 } ); // output: Baaark!

        }// end function

    }// end class

}// end package

internal interface IDog
{
    function bark(args:Object = null):Boolean

}// end interface

internal class StrayDog implements IDog
{
    public function StrayDog() {}

    public function bark(args:Object = null):Boolean
    {
        var barked:Boolean = true;

        if (!args) trace("Bark!");
        else  barked = false;

        return barked;

    }// end function

}// end class

internal class AlphaDog extends StrayDog
{
    public function AlphaDog() {}

    override public function bark(args:Object = null):Boolean
    {
        var barked:Boolean = true;

        if (!super.bark(args))
        {
            if (args.volume)
            {
                if (args.volume <= 0) trace("...")
                else if (args.volume > 0 && args.volume <= 0.5) trace("Bark!")
                else if (args.volume > 0.5) trace("BARK!!!");
                else throw new ArgumentError("volume must be between 0 and 1");

            }
            else 
            {
                barked = false;

            }// end if

        }// end if

        return barked;

    }// end function

}// end class

internal class SupremeDog extends AlphaDog
{
    public function SupremeDog() {}

    override public function bark(args:Object = null):Boolean
    {
        var barked:Boolean = true;

        if (!super.bark(args))
        {
            if (args.length)
            {
                if (args.length == 1) trace("Bark!")
                else if (args.length == 2) trace("Baark!")
                else if (args.length == 3) trace("Baaark!");
                else throw new ArgumentError("length must be either 1, 2 or 3");
            }
            else 
            {
                barked = false;

            }// end if

        }// end if

        return barked;

    }// end function

}// end class
share|improve this answer
    
Your answer isn't wrong in a strict sense - what you propose is perfectly okay to do -, but it doesn't quite work in the same way that overloading a method or specifying an initial value for the parameter do. With an initial value in the signature, you can add default values in each override, such as 0.1 for LittleDog or 1.0 for BigDog. In your example, you'd have to specify a default value in the constructor. Plus, it makes you write a lot more code... I don't think you should be down voted, though, because the approach is valid - it's just far less elegant. –  weltraumpirat Feb 3 '12 at 8:55
    
@weltraumpirat your absolutely right, it's less elegant. The reason I suggested it as an alternative is because down the line it allows for extra parameters to be added in the form of getter and setter methods. However doing it The_asMan's way only allows for a little more wiggle room by only allowing the option of one particular parameter(volume) to be added or excluded, what happens if pitch comes into play? –  Taurayi Feb 3 '12 at 14:49
    
Well, there's always ...args . –  weltraumpirat Feb 3 '12 at 15:09
    
@weltraumpirat I was just about to add that function bark(args:Object = null). I would have sooner but I was trying to create another wacky idea. –  Taurayi Feb 3 '12 at 15:16

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