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I've rather wondered into the world of Haskell with no prior background of anything to do with this. Reason being that I'm come across a puzzle that I'm trying to solve that seems to be based around haskell code. I believe that what I'm after is an integer.

What I'm trying to do is the following

let a = \x -> x (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> y (y z)) (\x -> y (y (y (y (y (y (y x))))))) z) (\x -> y (y (y (y (y (y (y (y (y x))))))))) z) y (y z)) (\x -> y (y (y (y x)))) z) y (y z)) (\x -> y (y (y (y x)))) z) (\x -> y (y (y (y (y x))))) z) y (y z)) (\x -> y (y (y (y (y (y (y (y x)))))))) z) (\x -> y (y (y (y (y (y (y (y x)))))))) z) (\x -> y (y (y (y (y (y (y (y x)))))))) z) (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> y (y z)) (\x -> y (y (y (y (y (y (y (y (y x))))))))) z) y (y z)) (\x -> y (y (y (y (y x))))) z) (\x -> y (y (y (y (y (y x)))))) z) y (y z)) (\x -> y (y x)) z) (\x -> y (y (y (y (y (y x)))))) z)

a (1+) 0

This returns the following error message

<interactive>:1:4:
No instance for (Num
                   (((t20 -> t20) -> t20 -> t20) -> (t20 -> t20) -> t20 -> t20))
  arising from the literal `1'
Possible fix:
  add an instance declaration for
  (Num (((t20 -> t20) -> t20 -> t20) -> (t20 -> t20) -> t20 -> t20))
In the first argument of `(+)', namely `1'
In the first argument of `a', namely `(1 +)'
In the expression: a (1 +) 0

<interactive>:1:8:
No instance for (Num (t20 -> t20))
  arising from the literal `0'
Possible fix: add an instance declaration for (Num (t20 -> t20))
In the second argument of `a', namely `0'
In the expression: a (1 +) 0
In an equation for `it': it = a (1 +) 0

Simple question - what do I need to do to make this work?

Please bear in mind that I have very little idea about this at the moment. I would massively appreciate any help that anybody could give me!

Edit:

I did get a similar expression to work:

let x = \s z -> ((\s z -> ((\s z -> ((\s z -> ((\s z -> (((\s z -> ((\s z -> (s . s) z) . (\s z -> (s . s . s) z)) s z) s) . ((\s z -> s z) s)) z) . (\s z -> (((\s z -> ((\s z -> ((\s z -> (s . s) z) . (\s z -> (s . s) z)) s z) . (\s z -> (s . s . s) z)) s z) s) . ((\s z -> s z) s)) z)) s z) . (\s z -> (((\s z -> ((\s z -> (s . s) z) (\s z -> ((\s z -> (s . s) z) . (\s z -> (s . s) z)) s z)) s z) s) . ((\s z -> (s . s . s) z) s)) z)) s z) . (\s z -> (((\s z -> ((\s z -> (s . s) z) (\s z -> ((\s z -> (s . s) z) . (\s z -> (s . s) z)) s z)) s z) s) . ((\s z -> (((\s z -> ((\s z -> (s . s) z) . (\s z -> (s . s . s) z)) s z) s) . ((\s z -> s z) s)) z) s)) z)) s z) . (\s z -> (((\s z -> ((\s z -> ((\s z -> (s . s) z) . (\s z -> (s . s . s) z)) s z) . (\s z -> (((\s z -> ((\s z -> ((\s z -> (s . s) z) . (\s z -> (s . s) z)) s z) . (\s z -> (s . s . s) z)) s z) s) . ((\s z -> s z) s)) z)) s z) s) . ((\s z -> s z) s)) z)) s z

x (1+) 0

which returns the integer 3141593

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8  
What are you trying to do with that? –  minitech Feb 2 '12 at 22:57
    
I'm trying to work out which integer (or integers) is/are represented by the long string. –  Plasadda Feb 2 '12 at 23:00
    
Simplify your test case to its bare minimum. –  Thomas Eding Feb 2 '12 at 23:05
    
Based on the function's type a :: (((t1 -> t1) -> t1 -> t1) -> ((t2 -> t2) -> t2 -> t2) -> t) -> t, I doubt it does remotely what you're expecting. For instance, a only accepts one parameter: a really complicated function! –  Ken Wayne VanderLinde Feb 2 '12 at 23:08
    
Are you sure it wasn't supposed to be a ($) (+1) (0)? –  rampion Feb 3 '12 at 14:01

2 Answers 2

Ok, let's break this down to smaller pieces. As it is, that expression's just so much line noise.

First, note that there's a bunch of things like: (\x -> y (y (y (y (y (y x)))))) for varying numbers of applications of y. So let's abstract that out:

(^^) :: (a -> a) -> Int -> (a -> a)
y ^^ 0 = id
y ^^ n = y . (y ^^ (n - 1))

So (\x -> y (y (y (y (y (y x)))))) is just y ^^ 6.

This starts to look like this:

let a = \x -> x 
              (\y z -> 
                (\y z -> 
                  (\y z -> 
                    (\y z -> 
                      (\y z -> 
                        (\y z -> 
                          (\y z -> 
                            (\y z -> 
                              (\y z -> 
                                (\y z -> 
                                  (\y z -> 
                                    (\y z -> y (y z)) (y ^^ 7) z) 
                                  (y ^^ 9) z) 
                                y (y z)) 
                              (y ^^ 4) z) 
                            y (y z)) 
                          (y ^^ 4) z) 
                        (y ^^ 5) z) 
                      y (y z)) 
                    (y ^^ 8) z) 
                  (y ^^ 8) z) 
                (y ^^ 8) z) 
              (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> (\y z -> y (y z)) (y ^^ 9) z) y (y z)) (y ^^ 5) z) (y ^^ 6) z) y (y z)) (y ^^ 2) z) (y ^^ 6) z)

Still not great, but let's focus on the tip of that gigantic wedge

(\y z -> y (y z)) (y ^^ 7) z 

(\y z -> y (y z)) is just (\y -> y ^^ 2), so let's put that in:

(\y -> y ^^ 2) (y ^^ 7) z 

Using substitution, that gives us

((y ^^ 7) ^^ 2) z

This is where I show off my precognizant naming skills, and make the outrageous (but true!) claim that (y ^^ 7) ^^ 2 == (y ^^ 14). That is, in english, if we call y seven times in a row, twice in a row, that's the same as calling y fourteen times in a row.

So now we're left with

(y ^^ 14) z

And if we back off a bit, that's in

(\y z -> (y ^^ 14) z) (y ^^ 9) z

Which is the same as

(\y -> y ^^ 14) (y ^^ 9) z

Which is the same as

((y ^^ 9) ^^ 14) z

Which is the same as

(y ^^ 126) z

And so on and so forth.

Occasionally you'll get a situation like

(\y -> y ^^ n) y (y z)

Which is really just

(y ^^ n) (y z)

Or

(y ^^ (n+1)) z

Anyway, You can use these methods to continue simplifying your code until you get

let a = \x -> x (\y -> y ^^ 2652672) (\y -> y ^^ 6852)

Or something like that, I might have screwed up counting the ys at one point.

But that's about as simple as it's going to get.

Now you can pass a a function like: a $ \f g -> f (+1) 0 + g (+1) 0 which will just add 1 to 0 2652672 times, and add 1 to 0 6852 times, and sum the results. As we've currently implemented (^^) this would take a long time to give 2659524.

share|improve this answer
    
Great - thanks for the insight. I will have a go at that tomorrow. –  Plasadda Feb 2 '12 at 23:42
    
Thought I'd come back and say thank you again. Worked through this today and got the two intergers out, being 5,212,672 and 6,852 which did solve the problem. –  Plasadda Feb 3 '12 at 21:25

The type of a is rather complicated, and your arguments don't fit that function:

Prelude> :t a
a :: (((t1 -> t1) -> t1 -> t1) -> ((t2 -> t2) -> t2 -> t2) -> t)
     -> t

Since the type of (1+) :: Num a => a -> a isn't of the form (((t1 -> t1) -> t1 -> t1) -> ((t2 -> t2) -> t2 -> t2) -> t) it isn't a valid argument for a.

It's hard to say where the problem comes from since it's not clear what the expression is supposed to do or how you derived it. Maybe some parenthesis are wrong or the parameter names of nested lambda expressions hiding the parameters of outer lambdas is causing the issue.

share|improve this answer
1  
I tried: a ($) ($) (+1) 0... Don't do it at home! :D –  Ptival Feb 2 '12 at 23:14
    
You can for example say a (\x y -> 123), but that seems rather pointless... –  sth Feb 2 '12 at 23:20
    
The expression was supplied by the person setting the puzzle - other people have solved apparently. I'll try looking into the parenthesis etc. –  Plasadda Feb 2 '12 at 23:39
1  
I have a feeling that this expression is an example of Church numerals: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_encoding –  Ed'ka Feb 3 '12 at 7:02
    
@Ptival: You only need the one ($) (though the extra doesn't hurt) a ($) (+1) (0) :: Num b => b –  rampion Feb 3 '12 at 13:59

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