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I have a page on our intranet that submits requests to a perl CGI script. That script in turn calls a stored procedure on a SQL Server DB that check whether an object with certain attributes exists. If it does, the storproc returns the instrument's id, if it doesn't, it creates a new instrument and returns that new instrument's id. The stored procedure creates a transaction, and also uses with (TABLOCKX) in the insert statement. For user-friendliness, when said user submits a bunch of requests simultaneously, the web pages submits the requests to the perl script asynchronously. I thought that when several requests are submitted that all require a new instrument, the first one to hit the storproc would run, lock the table, create the new instrument, release the lock, and then the subsequent calls to the storproc would be aware of the new instrument and use that. What I saw in practice was that there would be a couple of requests that create the new instrument, and the rest would use the most recent one. I tried using a setTimeout on the client side to space out the requests, but that doesn't seem to make a difference. Any ideas as to what I may be doing wrong?

Here is the code of the stored procedure:

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[CreateFutures]
@code varchar(5),
@month int,
@year int,
@currency varchar(3)
AS
BEGIN
SET NOCOUNT ON;
BEGIN TRANSACTION

declare @ticker varchar(7)
declare @yearCode char(1)
declare @res as Table (id int)
declare @n as int

set @yearCode = convert(char(1), @year % 10)

set @ticker = (
    select @code + futures + @yearCode
    from FuturesMonthCodes 
    where month = @month
)

insert into @res
select top 1 instrument
from InstrumentFutures // This is a view that joins InstrumentText and InstrumentNumber data
where ticker = @ticker
and code = @code
and month = @month
and year = @year
and currency = @currency
order by instrument

set @n = (select COUNT(id) from @res)

if @n = 0
    begin
        print 'Creating Future'
        declare @id int
        declare @stamp datetime
        set @stamp = CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
        insert into Instrument with (TABLOCKX) (insertTime) values (@stamp)
        set @id = (select SCOPE_IDENTITY());

        insert into InstrumentText      (instrumentId, name, value) values (@id, 'type',    'futures')
        insert into InstrumentText      (instrumentId, name, value) values (@id, 'ticker',  @ticker)
        insert into InstrumentText      (instrumentId, name, value) values (@id, 'code',    @code)
        insert into InstrumentText      (instrumentId, name, value) values (@id, 'currency',@currency)
        insert into InstrumentNumber    (instrumentId, name, value) values (@id, 'month',   @month)
        insert into InstrumentNumber    (instrumentId, name, value) values (@id, 'year',    @year)

        insert into @res (id) values (@id)
    end
commit transaction

if @n = 0 --instrument created
    select top 1 id, 1 from @res order by id
else --returning existing instrument
    select top 1 id, 0 from @res order by id
END
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2  
To start with, post the code of you insert procedure. –  Remus Rusanu Feb 2 '12 at 23:46

1 Answer 1

It is more sql problem than perl.

Let say 3 scripts try to run this stored proc in the same time.

The first execute and it is locked the table. The others waited for the table to unlock but they not reread the data when the locking is over so they used old data.

If your stored proc make a select you have to rerun it after the locking are gone.

Regards,

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