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I am learning about the RAII idiom in C++, and how to use smart pointers.

In my reading, I have come across two things that, to me, seem to contradict each other.

Quoted from http://www.hackcraft.net/raii/:

...if a member object with RAII semantics has been created and an exception happens before the constructor has completed then its destructor will be called as part of the stack unwinding. Hence an object which controls multiple resources can guarnatee their cleanup even if it isn’t fully constructed by using member RAII objects.

But quoted from http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/exceptions.html#faq-17.10:

If a constructor throws an exception, the object's destructor is not run. If your object has already done something that needs to be undone (such as allocating some memory, opening a file, or locking a semaphore), this "stuff that needs to be undone" must be remembered by a data member inside the object.

And then the second linked source recommends using smart pointers to deal with the issue of things that were already allocated in the constructor.

So what actually happens in these scenarios?

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7  
+1 this is the way that "newprogrammer[s]" should ask questions! –  Cody Gray Feb 3 '12 at 4:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You're misunderstanding the first quote. That's not hard, since it's confusing.

if a member object with RAII semantics has been created and an exception happens before the constructor has completed then its destructor will be called as part of the stack unwinding.

That's what it says. Here's what it meant:

if a member object with RAII semantics has been created and an exception happens in the outer object before the outer object's constructor has completed then the member object's destructor will be called as part of the stack unwinding.

See the difference? The idea is that the member object completed its constructor, but the owning type didn't. It threw somewhere in its constructor. This will cause the destructor of all of its members to be called, but not its own destructor.

Here's an example:

class SomeType
{
  InnerType val;
public:
  SomeType() val(...)
  {
    throw Exception;
  }
};

When you create a SomeType instance, it will call InnerType::InnerType. As long as that doesn't throw, it will then enter SomeType's constructor. When that throws, it will cause val to be destroyed, thus calling InnerType::~InnerType.

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Ah that makes sense... By the way, are you the one who wrote the wonderful 3d graphics guide? I can't thank you enough how great that guide is. –  newprogrammer Feb 3 '12 at 1:08
2  
"This will cause the destructor of all of its members to be called, but not its own destructor." - well, just the ones that had completed construction before the exception was thrown.... –  Tony D Feb 3 '12 at 1:30

There's no contradiction here; there's just some confusing terminology being used in different contexts.

If an object's constructor throws an exception, then the following occurs (assuming the exception is caught):

  1. All local variables in the constructor have their destructors invoked, releasing all resources they've acquired (if any).
  2. All of the direct subobjects of the object whose constructor threw an exception will have their destructors invoked, releasing resources they've acquired (if any).
  3. All base classes of the object whose constructor threw will have their destructors invoked (since they were fully constructed before the derived class constructor ran)
  4. Further cleanup from the caller etc. will take place.

As a result, any resources that are managed by smart pointers or other RAII objects that are data members of the object being destructed will indeed be cleaned up, but specialized code to do cleanup in the destructor of the object won't fire.

Hope this helps!

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Yes your step by step description cleared up everything! –  newprogrammer Feb 3 '12 at 1:13

These two statements don't contradict each other, but the first one has some unfortunate language. When the construction of some object throws, it's deconstructor won't be called, but all objects owned by that object will be destructed by their individual deconstructors.

So with RAII and smart pointers the destructors for any pointer members of an object will be called independently of the destructor of the owing object. Raw pointers do not free the memory they point to and have to be deleted manually. Should the constructor of the owning object throw raw pointers will not be freed. This cannot happen with smart pointers.

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