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This is a continuation of an issue I'm still experiencing here. I'm trying to prevent the OData reflection provider from trying to expose ALL of the CLR classes in my assembly.

Consider the following CLR class:

public class Foo
{
    public Guid FooID { get; set; }
    public string FooName { get; set; }
}

And the following class to expose Foo as an IQueryable collection:

public class MyEntities 
{ 
    public IQueryable<Foo> Foos 
    { 
        get 
        { 
            return DataManager.GetFoos().AsQueryable<Foo>(); 
        } 
    }
} 

And the following DataService class:

public class MyDataService : DataService<MyEntities> 
{ 
    public static void InitializeService(DataServiceConfiguration config) 
    { 
        config.SetEntitySetAccessRule("Foos", EntitySetRights.All); 
        config.DataServiceBehavior.MaxProtocolVersion = DataServiceProtocolVersion.V2; 
    } 
}

This all works hunkey dorey and the DataService can display a collection of Foo. But if change Foo to extend a very simple base object such as:

public class Foo : MyObjectBase
{
    public Guid FooID { get; set; } 
    public string FooName { get; set; }
}

Then (even though I'm only trying to expose 1 collection), the reflection provider grabs ALL objects that extend MyObjectBase, causing loads of errors.

The base class is a simple abstract class that implements a number of interfaces and provides another property such as:

public abstract class MyObjectBase: IDataObject, IDataErrorInfo, INotifyPropertyChanged, IDisposable
{
    public virtual Guid ID { get; set; }
}

Even putting IgnoreProperties on any public properties here doesn't help. Is there any way to dial down what the reflection provider is doing?

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1  
I had the same problem and I was not able to find good solution. I ended up with doubling-up of the MyObjectBase properties directly in Foo. – Andrew Savinykh Feb 3 '12 at 1:44
    
Ugh, not really an option with the couple hundred CLR classes in this project. Still working on a custom provider route. – Dave Clemmer Feb 3 '12 at 1:50
    
True, I only had a couple. You can have MyObjectBaseOdata and MyObjectBaseEverythingElse I guess... – Andrew Savinykh Feb 3 '12 at 1:52
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could set:

config.SetEntitySetAccessRule("TypeNotAccessible", EntitySetRights.All); 

to

config.SetEntitySetAccessRule("TypeNotAccessible", EntitySetRights.None);

On any classes you don't want accessible. I do this using the help of a custom attribute that indicates the rights I want for a particular class. This in combination with looping over all known types (that implement my attribute), makes it possible to do this without explicit code to set each class individually.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 thanks M. I was trying to turn off the rights on some of the classes. Trouble is, all of the DAL classes have the same name as the corresponding BLL classes I want (different namespace). Can you specify a full or partial namespace in SetEntityAccessRule? – Dave Clemmer Feb 3 '12 at 3:02
    
I've never had to do so and the MSDN docs don't specify what is legal so I'd recommend trying it and seeing what happens. This probably isn't the answer you were looking for though. – M.Babcock Feb 3 '12 at 3:08
    
Using SetEntitySetAccessRule on unwanted classes doesn't seem to help in general. I even tried turning all access off config.SetEntitySetAccessRule("*", EntitySetRights.None); and still get the same errors of not finding those types in the data context. – Dave Clemmer Feb 3 '12 at 3:14
    
I guess it is possible that my attempts have been without success, but according to the docs, "Denies all rights to access data." Unfortunately I'm not in a place to test it (my work VPN is down and I don't have enough interest in it to create one from scratch) – M.Babcock Feb 3 '12 at 3:16
    
Thanks for your help. – Dave Clemmer Feb 3 '12 at 3:37

I was unable to find a way to dial down the reflection provider with a rich data model. I ended up building a custom provider as indicated here.

If someone provides a way to dial down the reflection provider, I'll accept that answer.

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