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Here is my code:

class Foo
{
  public:
    Foo(const char*);
};

class Bar
{
  public:
    Foo bu("adfds");
};

int main()
{
    return 0;
}

Foo::Foo(const char* iLoc)
{ }

When I try to create a Foo class within the Bar class, I get the syntax error when trying to pass to the constructor. Why is this the case?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I prefer this to egrunin's answer as you don't have to track memory allocation.

class Bar
{

private:

    Foo bu;

public:

    Bar()
    : bu("adfds")
    {
    }

};
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You can't initialize bu in the class declaration. Is this what you want?

class Bar
{
public:
    Foo *bu;

    Bar() {
        bu = new Foo("adfds");
    }
};

Edit

As pointed out in the comments, here's a way of doing it without making bu a pointer:

class Bar : bu("adfds")
{
public:
    Foo bu;
};
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2  
Surely Bar() : bu("adfds") {} would have sufficed? –  ta.speot.is Feb 3 '12 at 4:38
    
I think I understand.. so I have to initialize bu in the Bar class constructor? –  Jcrack Feb 3 '12 at 4:40
    
I'm so confused.. so I have to do this anytime I want to use a class in another class? –  Jcrack Feb 3 '12 at 4:49
    
@todda.speot.is: I figured the more verbose example would be clearer to a beginner. I've appended your suggestion. –  egrunin Feb 3 '12 at 17:07
    
You've misunderstood my suggestion. I'm initializing bu in the constructor, to save the effort of dynamically allocating memory. Not deriving from bu. –  ta.speot.is Feb 3 '12 at 20:29

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