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I'm working with a list of dict objects that looks like this (the order of the objects differs):

[
    {'name': 'Foo', 'score': 1},
    {'name': 'Bar', 'score': 2},
    {'name': 'Foo', 'score': 3},
    {'name': 'Bar', 'score': 3},
    {'name': 'Foo', 'score': 2},
    {'name': 'Baz', 'score': 2},
    {'name': 'Baz', 'score': 1},
    {'name': 'Bar', 'score': 1}
]

What I want to do is remove duplicate names, keeping only the one of each name that has the highest 'score'. The results from the above list would be:

[
    {'name': 'Baz', 'score': 2},
    {'name': 'Foo', 'score': 3},
    {'name': 'Bar', 'score': 3}
]

I'm not sure which pattern to use here (aside from a seemingly idiotic loop that keeps checking if the current dict's 'name' is in the list already and then checking if its 'score' is higher than the existing one's 'score'.

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3  
Go with the loop, it's simple and clear. –  Robert Peters Feb 3 '12 at 5:01
3  
Its Simple and Clear and easy to read in six months when you need to change it "slightly" –  James Khoury Feb 3 '12 at 5:03
2  
+1 There is something magic about this question in that it elicted a diverse and interesting set of answers. It is fascinating how many completely different solutions this problem has. I'm starring this as a favorite because of the rich answer set (am also upvoting every answer that has a creative or interesting solution). –  Raymond Hettinger Feb 3 '12 at 9:04
1  
@Raymond - thanks. I was excited to see the variety, too. I had a couple versions of it, but gleaned a much cleaner one from the list. Btw, I own and have read your book (Advanced Python, in case you have others), and it was great. I personally think you should write another book, maybe on extra advanced Python or on design patterns in Python. –  orokusaki Feb 25 '12 at 20:17

7 Answers 7

up vote 15 down vote accepted

One way to do that is:

data = collections.defaultdict(list)
for i in my_list:
    data[i['name']].append(i['score'])
output = [{'name': i, 'score': max(j)} for i,j in data.items()]

so output will be:

[{'score': 2, 'name': 'Baz'},
 {'score': 3, 'name': 'Foo'},
 {'score': 3, 'name': 'Bar'}]
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2  
I learned a lot about Python from this, thanks –  mVChr Feb 3 '12 at 5:18

There's no need for defaultdicts or sets here. You can just use dirt simple dicts and lists.

Summarize the best running score in a dictionary and convert the result back into a list:

>>> s = [
    {'name': 'Foo', 'score': 1},
    {'name': 'Bar', 'score': 2},
    {'name': 'Foo', 'score': 3},
    {'name': 'Bar', 'score': 3},
    {'name': 'Foo', 'score': 2},
    {'name': 'Baz', 'score': 2},
    {'name': 'Baz', 'score': 1},
    {'name': 'Bar', 'score': 1}
]
>>> d = {}
>>> for entry in s:
        name, score = entry['name'], entry['score']
        d[name] = max(d.get(name, 0), score)

>>> [{'name': name, 'score': score} for name, score in d.items()]
[{'score': 2, 'name': 'Baz'}, {'score': 3, 'name': 'Foo'}, {'score': 3, 'name': 'Bar'}]
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1  
This solution would be the most elegant if we were using a data structure like {'Foo': 3} instead of [{'name': 'Foo', 'score': 3}]. I would argue that the poster of the original question should be doing so. –  fletom Feb 4 '12 at 6:07
1  
This is my favorite solution. The only thing I would change is d.get(name,0) to d.get(name,score). This would allow negative scores also. –  robert king Feb 7 '12 at 23:08

Just for fun, here is a purely functional approach:

>>> map(dict, dict(sorted(map(sorted, map(dict.items, s)))).items())
[{'score': 3, 'name': 'Bar'}, {'score': 2, 'name': 'Baz'}, {'score': 3, 'name': 'Foo'}]
share|improve this answer

Sorting is half the battle.

import itertools
import operator

scores = [
    {'name': 'Foo', 'score': 1},
    {'name': 'Bar', 'score': 2},
    {'name': 'Foo', 'score': 3},
    {'name': 'Bar', 'score': 3},
    {'name': 'Foo', 'score': 2},
    {'name': 'Baz', 'score': 2},
    {'name': 'Baz', 'score': 1},
    {'name': 'Bar', 'score': 1}
]

result = []
sl = sorted(scores, key=operator.itemgetter('name', 'score'),
  reverse=True)
name = object()
for el in sl:
  if el['name'] == name:
    continue
  name = el['name']
  result.append(el)
print result
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 This answer is the only which doesn't morph the dataset. Looks consistent and dictionaries can have extra items if OP wants. –  JBernardo Feb 3 '12 at 5:28
1  
+1 for "Sorting is half the battle." –  Zachary Young Feb 3 '12 at 5:31
    
What's the purpose of using object() here? –  fletom Feb 4 '12 at 6:13
2  
@nomulous: It creates a new object that cannot possibly be found in the dictionary. None (or any other existing object for that matter) could (although it isn't in this case) be found in the data. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Feb 4 '12 at 6:16
    
@Ignacio That's awesome! I just typed in object() == object() and the answer is False, which is really handy. Thanks! –  fletom Feb 6 '12 at 3:51

This is the simplest way I can think of:

names = set(d['name'] for d in my_dicts)
new_dicts = []
for name in names:
    d = dict(name=name)
    d['score'] = max(d['score'] for d in my_dicts if d['name']==name)
    new_dicts.append(d)

#new_dicts
[{'score': 2, 'name': 'Baz'},
 {'score': 3, 'name': 'Foo'},
 {'score': 3, 'name': 'Bar'}]

Personally, I prefer not to import modules when the problem is too small.

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In case you haven't heard of group by, this is nice use of it:

from itertools import groupby

data=[
    {'name': 'Foo', 'score': 1},
    {'name': 'Bar', 'score': 2},
    {'name': 'Foo', 'score': 3},
    {'name': 'Bar', 'score': 3},
    {'name': 'Foo', 'score': 2},
    {'name': 'Baz', 'score': 2},
    {'name': 'Baz', 'score': 1},
    {'name': 'Bar', 'score': 1}
]

keyfunc=lambda d:d['name']
data.sort(key=keyfunc)

ans=[]
for k, g in groupby(data, keyfunc):
    ans.append({k:max((d['score'] for d in g))})
print ans

>>>
[{'Bar': 3}, {'Baz': 2}, {'Foo': 3}]
share|improve this answer

I think I can come up with an one-liner here:

result = dict((x['name'],x) for x in sorted(data,key=lambda x: x['score'])).values()
share|improve this answer
    
Nice. This is somewhat readable for a one-liner. –  Raymond Hettinger Feb 3 '12 at 9:05

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