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So I am beginning to write a program to parse and then process a large amount of text. I have set up a class that contains methods which are run as boost threads. As of now each of these threads simply prints some text statement and then return. The code compiles and runs without any errors. However, the text is printed out inconsistently. This is to be expected as the threads are running in parallel, so I tried using a mutex to coordinate use of the output. However, I am clearly doing something wrong as the output is still inconsistent. To add on to this some output is printed twice which I cannot explain as a failure to code the mutex correctly. Below is my code:

/* 
 * File:   ThreadParser.h
 * Author: Aaron Springut
 *
 * Created on Feburary 2, 2012, 5:13 PM
 */

#ifndef THREADPARSER_H
#define THREADPARSER_H

#include <string.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <boost/thread/thread.hpp>
#include <boost/thread/mutex.hpp>
#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include "FileWordCounter.h"

class ThreadParser {

    public:

    ThreadParser();
    ThreadParser(std::string fileName);



    private:

    //mutex for cout
    boost::mutex coutMut;  

    std::string dataFile;
    FileWordCounter fCounter;

    //threads
    void parseFile();
    void processSearches();



};

#endif     


/* 
 * File:   ThreadParser.cpp
 * Author: Aaron Springut
 *
 * Created on Feburary 2, 2012, 5:13 PM
 */


 #include "ThreadParser.h"

 using namespace std;


 ThreadParser::ThreadParser(){

    double buyNum = 0;
    buyNum = buyNum * 100;
    cout << "Percentage of people buying: "<< buyNum <<"%"<<endl;

 }

 ThreadParser::ThreadParser(string fileName){

    dataFile = fileName;
    double buyNum = 0;

    //create the mutex and aquire a lock on it for this thread

    boost::mutex::scoped_lock(coutMut);

    boost::thread parseThread(boost::bind(&ThreadParser::parseFile, this));
    boost::thread processSearches(boost::bind(&ThreadParser::processSearches,this));

    buyNum = buyNum * 100;
    cout << "Percentage of people buying: "<< buyNum <<"%"<<endl;


 }


 void ThreadParser::parseFile(){

    boost::mutex::scoped_lock(coutMut);
    cout << "parseFileThreadLaunch"<<endl;
    return;

 }


 void ThreadParser::processSearches(){

    boost::mutex::scoped_lock(coutMut);
    cout << "processSearchesLaunch"<<endl;
    return;

 }

As an example of what is going wrong here are two outputs from the program that runs this:

Percentage of people buying: parseFileThreadLaunch
processSearchesLaunch
0%

Okay, cout is not thread safe and I've done something wrong with the mutex.

Percentage of people buying: parseFileThreadLaunch
0%
processSearchesLaunch
processSearchesLaunch

This is confusing, how is the last line being printed twice? Is it a consequence of cout not being thread safe? Or, am I missing part of the bigger picture.

EDIT: The class is being called like so in the main function:

string fileName("AOLData.txt");
cout << fileName<< endl;

ThreadParser tp(fileName);
share|improve this question
    
What are you doing to produce this output? There's no main function, so we have no idea what methods you are calling, on what objects, or with what parameters. –  David Schwartz Feb 3 '12 at 5:04
    
Edit: fit poorly in here. So I edited the main post. –  Aaron S Feb 3 '12 at 5:08
    
One call to one instance of the class? –  David Schwartz Feb 3 '12 at 5:08
    
Yes. that is correct. –  Aaron S Feb 3 '12 at 5:12
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted
boost::mutex::scoped_lock(coutMut);

This does not do what you think it does. This creates a temporary, which is immediately destroyed, releasing the lock. Just like int(3);.

You want:

boost::mutex::scoped_lock sl(moutMut);

This creates an object, sl, that holds the lock until it goes out of scope.

share|improve this answer
    
That was the problem, or at least part of it. Now it seems to get all the way through the first print statement without being interrupted. However, it still prints twice sometimes and segfaults others. –  Aaron S Feb 3 '12 at 5:16
    
With this main function and the scoped_lock fix, it works perfectly for me. int main(void) { string fileName("AOLData.txt"); cout << fileName<< endl; ThreadParser tp(fileName); sleep(1); } –  David Schwartz Feb 3 '12 at 5:29
    
Adding that sleep(1) does it for me. I guess the main thread was ending early causing other stuff to go out of scope. –  Aaron S Feb 3 '12 at 5:32
    
Yeah, then you're running destructors for global objects (like cout!) while those threads are trying to work. Not to mention, the ThreadParser object itself ran out of scope, so the threads are operating on an object that no longer exists. You must keep an object in scope until you're sure it's no longer needed! (You should, most likely, be using smart pointers to let the threads hold references to the objects they operate on.) –  David Schwartz Feb 3 '12 at 5:33
    
That makes a lot of sense now. I guess I should have a condition variable in there that forces it to wait for the other threads to complete –  Aaron S Feb 3 '12 at 5:35
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