Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Then I have to implement the Abstract Class in Data Tables.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Reno, Bill the Lizard Feb 3 '12 at 13:58

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2 Answers 2

It's not clear what you mean by "implement the abstract class in data tables" but yes, a Windows Forms project certainly can have abstract classes.

If you have an abstract GUI class then you won't be able to use it directly in the designer but you can use concrete derived classes. That makes sense given that you wouldn't be able to instantiate the abstract class directly anyway. (It's more of a pain when you try to create a generic UI component, but that's a different matter.)

share|improve this answer
    
Do they this simpler in VS 2010? With 2008, this was possible, but only indirectly. –  Ken Wayne VanderLinde Feb 3 '12 at 7:28
    
@KenWayneVanderLinde: That question isn't terribly clear - it's not obvious where the concrete class was being instantiated. Basically the designer needs to know about the concrete class involved, I believe. –  Jon Skeet Feb 3 '12 at 7:36
    
I created Abstract Class in console Apps..but now I want to Create an Abstract Class in C# Windows Forms and then i have to insert or update Values in DataTables.My problem is how can i create Abstract Class in Windows Forms –  user1182268 Feb 3 '12 at 7:44
    
@user1182268: Exactly the same way as in a console app - you just use the abstract modifier. As we've said, it's tricky if you want the abstract class to be a UI component in itself, but it doesn't sound like that would be appropriate here anyway. What have you tried? –  Jon Skeet Feb 3 '12 at 7:47
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/1620847/… Thanks I got the Answer –  user1182268 Feb 3 '12 at 7:51

Yes, of course you can create abstract classes for Windows.Forms. After all, Windows.Forms is just a bunch regular c# classes, and they really do behave like any other class in c#.

Until you want GUI support. Unfortunately, the GUI designer need to instantiate the class in order to help you do the design, so this would not be an option.

share|improve this answer
    
Can You Tell me How to Create that Class.Send Me Reference Please I am Searching in net.I cant find it –  user1182268 Feb 3 '12 at 7:30
    
@user1182268: Create what class? You haven't given us any information about what you're trying to achieve. If you're very new to programming, I suggest you start off with console apps - they're a lot simpler. –  Jon Skeet Feb 3 '12 at 7:34
    
I created Abstract Class in console Apps..but now I want to Create an Abstract Class in C# Windows Forms and then i have to insert or update Values in DataTables.My problem is how can i create Abstract Class in Windows Forms –  user1182268 Feb 3 '12 at 7:37
    
Unfortunately, I don't have a full reference on hand. The key points are this, though: to make a form, inherit from the (System.Windows.Forms.Form)[msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… class. After that, it's just add controls to the form's Controls container. If you'd like hints on how these work, you can start by creating a simple, regular form with the designer, then look at the code which Visual Studio generates for you. Sorry I couldn't give you something more concrete. –  Ken Wayne VanderLinde Feb 3 '12 at 7:41
    
Just to follow up a bit: I'm assuming you would like to create an abstract GUI class. If you just want to make a regular abstract class, then it is no different from making an abstract class in a console app or a class library. –  Ken Wayne VanderLinde Feb 3 '12 at 7:43

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.