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I have a query I want to run as a subquery that will return a set of FK's. With them I want to return only rows that has a matching key.

Subquery:

SELECT ID 
FROM tblTenantTransCode 
WHERE
    tblTenantTransCode.CheckbookCode = 
      (SELECT ID FROM tblCheckbookCode WHERE Description = 'Rent Income')

That will return all the transaction codes that have a checkbook code that matches Rent Income

Now I want to select All Transactions where their transactioncode matches an ID returned in the subquery. I've gotten this far, but SQL Server complains of a syntax error. How can I do this?

Full Query:

SELECT * 
FROM tblTransaction
WHERE
    tblTransaction.TransactionCode IN 
      (SELECT ID FROM tblTenantTransCode 
       WHERE tblTenantTransCode.CheckbookCode = 
           (SELECT ID FROM tblCheckbookCode WHERE Description = 'Rent Income'))

Tables:

tblCheckbookCode  
   ID  
   Description  
   Other Info  

tblTenantTransCode  
   ID  
   CheckbookCode <-- fk we're looking for   
                     in the tblCheckbookCode.   
                     We're selecting only checkbook codes   
                     that have the Description 'Rent Income'  
   Other Info  

tblTransactions  
   ID  
   TransactionCode <-- fk to tenant transaction code.   
                       We're looking for an ID that is returned   
                       in the above query/join  
share|improve this question
    
Several possible SQL statements given as solutions. IMPORTANT NOTE: the statements that JOIN the other tables in the outer query have the potential to return "duplicate" rows (unless we assume something about some columns being UNIQUE. The title of original question asked about how to use the EXISTS predicate, which is one way to avoid the issue of duplicate rows. First and foremost, a query should return a "correct" result set, secondly, do it efficiently. Where a specified result set can't be returned efficiently enough, then we change the specification. –  spencer7593 May 28 '09 at 13:39

5 Answers 5

up vote 46 down vote accepted

To answer your question about using the EXISTS keyword, here is an example query that uses an EXISTS predicate, based on the query as currently given in your question.

    SELECT t.*
      FROM tblTransaction t
     WHERE EXISTS
           ( 
             SELECT 1
               FROM tblTenantTransCode ttc
               JOIN tblCheckbookCode cc
                 ON (cc.ID = ttc.CheckbookCode AND cc.Description='Rent Income')
              WHERE ttc.ID = t.TransactionCode
           )

Additional Details:

We all recognize that there are a variety of SQL statements that will return the result set that meets the specified requirements. And there are likely going to be differences in the observed performance of those queries. Performance is particularly dependent on the DBMS, the optimizer mode, the query plan, and the statistics (number of rows and data value distribution).

One advantage of the EXISTS is that it makes clear that we aren't interested returning any expressions from tables in the subquery. It serves to logically separate the subquery from the outer query, in a way that a JOIN does not.

Another advantage of using EXISTS is that avoids returning duplicate rows that would be (might be) returned if we were to instead use a JOIN.

An EXISTS predicate can be used to test for the existence of any related row in a child table, without requiring a join. As an example, the following query returns a set of all orders that have at least one associated line_item:

    SELECT o.*
      FROM order o
     WHERE EXISTS
           ( SELECT 1
               FROM line_item li
              WHERE li.order_id = o.id
           )

Note that the subquery doesn't need to find ALL matching line items, it only needs to find one row in order to satisfy the condition. (If we were to write this query as a JOIN, then we would return duplicate rows whenever an order had more than one line item.)

A NOT EXISTS predicate is also useful, for example, to return a set of orders that do not have any associated line_items.

    SELECT o.*
      FROM order o
     WHERE NOT EXISTS
           ( SELECT 1
               FROM line_item li
              WHERE li.order_id = o.id
           )

Of course, NOT EXISTS is just one alternative. An equivalent result set could be obtained using an OUTER join and an IS NULL test (assuming we have at least one expression available from the line_item table that is NOT NULL)

    SELECT o.*
      FROM order o
      LEFT
      JOIN line_item li ON (li.order_id = o.id)
     WHERE li.id IS NULL

There seems to be a lot of discussion (relating to answers to the original question) about needing to use an IN predicate, or needing to use a JOIN.

Those constructs are alternatives, but aren't necessary. The required result set can be returned by a query without using an IN and without using a JOIN. The result set can be returned with a query that uses an EXISTS predicate. (Note that the title of the OP question did ask about how to use the EXISTS keyword.)

Here is another alternative query (this is not my first choice), but the result set returned does satisfy the specified requirements:


    SELECT t.*
      FROM tblTransaction t
     WHERE EXISTS
           ( 
             SELECT 1
               FROM tblTenantTransCode ttc
              WHERE ttc.ID = t.TransactionCode
                AND EXISTS 
                    (
                      SELECT 1 
                        FROM tblCheckbookCode cc
                       WHERE cc.ID = ttc.CheckbookCode
                         AND cc.Description = 'Rent Income'
                    )
           )

Of primary importance, the query should return a correct result set, one that satisfies the specified requirements, given all possible sets of conditions.

Some of the queries presented as answers here do NOT return the requested result set, or if they do, they happen to do so by accident. Some of the queries will work if we pre-assume something about the data, such that some columns are UNIQUE and NOT NULL.

Performance differences

Sometimes a query with an EXISTS predicate will not perform as well as a query with a JOIN or an IN predicate. In some cases, it may perform better. (With the EXISTS predicate, the subquery only has to find one row that satisfies the condition, rather than finding ALL matching rows, as would be required by a JOIN.)

Performance of various query options is best gauged by observation.

share|improve this answer
3  
"The EXISTS also makes it clear you aren't interested in [rows from the inner tables" - also known as a "semi-join", and may show up in query plans as that. (I've seen SQL Server use a "left anti semi join" node, which was a bit startling the first time) Performance of the three methods of doing roughly the same thing vary wildly between different DB platforms and the data distribution. As ever, look at the query plan, don't guess. –  araqnid May 27 '09 at 1:18
    
@araqnid: I concur. Better than just looking at the query plan is to measure the actual performance of each query plan, which is easy to do on some database platforms. –  spencer7593 May 27 '09 at 15:21
1  
This is a really good answer, +1 –  Factor Mystic Jun 10 '10 at 15:37

You are describing an inner join.

select tc.id 
from tblTenantTransCode tc 
   inner join tblCheckbookCode cc on tc.CheckbookCode = cc.CheckbookCode

EDIT: It's still an inner join. I don't see any reason yet to use the IN clause.

select *
from tblTransaction t
   inner join tblTenantTransCode tc on tc.id = t.TransactionCode
   inner join tblCheckbookCode cc on cc.id = tc.CheckbookCode
where cc.description = 'Rent Income'

EDIT: If you must use the EXISTS predicate to solve this problem, see @spencer7953's answer. However, from what I'm seeing, the solution above is simpler and there are assumptions of uniqueness based on the fact that "Subquery" works for you (it wouldn't 100% of the time if there wasn't uniqueness in that table). I'm also addressing

Now I want to select All Transactions where their transactioncode matches an ID returned in the subquery

in my answer. If the request were something on the lines of this:

Now I want to select All Transcations when any transactioncode matches an ID returned in the subquery.

I would use EXISTS to see if any transactioncode existed in the child table and return every row or none as appropriate.

share|improve this answer
1  
I'd add that you would do a "where cc.Description = 'Rent Income'" to the end of that statement. –  Eric May 26 '09 at 20:21
    
Not quite. Sorry I wasn't descriptive enough, the subquery has it's own subquery, which could possibly be replaced with an inner join, but I'm not sure. –  Malfist May 26 '09 at 20:25
2  
Eric, What makes you think that "Joins are remarkably more efficient than IN clauses."? This is just not true. –  A-K May 26 '09 at 21:03
2  
I should elaborate: IN clauses with subqueries. Subqueries, especially when they use an element from the parent query, fire every row, making it wildly inefficient. Doing IN (1,2,3) is not inefficient at all. Doing IN (SELECT ID FROM A WHERE A.ID = SOME_PARENT_ID) is extremely inefficient. –  Eric May 26 '09 at 21:16
1  
That's just not true. If you are joining on a primary key, and not selecting columns from the second table, then they will have the same performance (and same query plan). If you're NOT joining on a primary key, then the join may cause duplicate rows. I.E. if tblCheckbookCode has 2 rows for 'Rent Income', then you'll see the transaction repeated twice, whereas with the subquery you'd only see it once. However, it's probably better practice to use a where exists clause, since you can easily extend it to match more than one column. But for one column, a where exists and an "in" are the same. –  John Gibb May 27 '09 at 12:33

Try this:

SELECT
    tblTenantTransCode.ID 
    FROM tblCheckbookCode 
        INNER JOIN tblTenantTransCode ON tblCheckbookCode.ID=tblTenantTransCode.CheckbookCode
    WHERE tblCheckbookCode.Description = 'Rent Income'

Make sure you index tblCheckbookCode.Description.

share|improve this answer

Given your full query, this query will get you where you need to go using a single join.

The join filters out any transaction that doesn't have a transaction code of 'Rent Income.' It will take all record from the first table, build out the subset of the second table (that WHERE clause limits the records), and then filters the first table where those table math the join condition.

SELECT 
    t.* 
FROM 
    tblTransaction t
    INNER JOIN tblTenantTransCode c ON
        t.TransactionCode = c.ID
    INNER JOIN tblCheckbookCode chk ON
        c.CheckbookCode = chk.ID
WHERE
    chk.Description = 'Rent Income'

Edit: One other note: Avoid using SELECT * -- always specify the columns. Edit Dos: I missed that there were three tables. Corrected! Thanks, spencer!

share|improve this answer
    
If my memory doesn't fail me, you could have even better performance by moving the "c.Description = 'Rent Income'" from the WHERE clause to the "INNER JOIN tblTenantTransCode c ON t.TransactionCode = c.ID AND c.Description = 'Rent Income'" –  Turro May 27 '09 at 8:12
1  
It doesn't matter (at least in SQL Server). The optimizer will feel free to rearrange joins and where clauses as long as they are equivalent, and with an inner join it NEVER matters whether the condition is on the join, or in the where clause. I would go with Eric's solution since it is more apparent to the next developer what's going on, but really it doesn't matter. –  John Gibb May 27 '09 at 12:36
    
@spencer: Thanks, I missed the third table! –  Eric May 27 '09 at 18:51
    
+1 @Eric, now the statement looks like it will return the specified result set. But note what happens with the result set if there happen to be TWO (or more) rows in tblCheckbookCode with 'Rent Income' as Description, the JOIN query will return "duplicate" rows, using an EXISTS predicate avoids that problem. –  spencer7593 Jun 24 '09 at 14:45

You need to use the 'IN' clause:

select id from tblTenantTransCode
where tblTenantTransCode.CheckbookCode in
    (select id from tblCheckbookCode
     where description = 'rent income')

an inner join would probably be a better solution though...

select ttc.id from tblTenantTransCode as ttc
inner join tblCheckbookCode as tcc
    on ttc.CheckBookId = tcc.id
where tcc.description = 'rent income'
share|improve this answer

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