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I would like to add many dummy-properties to a class via a decorator, like this:

def addAttrs(attr_names):
  def deco(cls):
    for attr_name in attr_names:
      def getAttr(self):
        return getattr(self, "_" + attr_name)
      def setAttr(self, value):
        setattr(self, "_" + attr_name, value)
      prop = property(getAttr, setAttr)
      setattr(cls, attr_name, prop)
      setattr(cls, "_" + attr_name, None) # Default value for that attribute
    return cls
  return deco

@addAttrs(['x', 'y'])
class MyClass(object):
  pass

Unfortunately, the decoarator seems to keep the reference of attr_name instead of its content. Therefore, MyClass.x and MyClass.y access both MyClass._y:

a = MyClass()
a.x = 5
print a._x, a._y
>>> None, 5
a.y = 8
print a._x, a._y
>>> None, 8

What do I have to change to get the expected behavior?

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You almost had it working. There is just one nit. When creating the inner functions, bind the current value of attr_name into the getter and setter functions:

def addAttrs(attr_names):
  def deco(cls):
    for attr_name in attr_names:
      def getAttr(self, attr_name=attr_name):
        return getattr(self, "_" + attr_name)
      def setAttr(self, value, attr_name=attr_name):
        setattr(self, "_" + attr_name, value)
      prop = property(getAttr, setAttr)
      setattr(cls, attr_name, prop)
      setattr(cls, "_" + attr_name, None) # Default value for that attribute
    return cls
  return deco

@addAttrs(['x', 'y'])
class MyClass(object):
  pass

This produces the expected result:

>>> a = MyClass()
>>> a.x = 5
>>> print a._x, a._y
5 None
>>> a.y = 8
>>> print a._x, a._y
5 8

Hope this helps. Happy decorating :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! Thanks for fast reply! – Philipp der Rautenberg Feb 3 '12 at 8:57

Python does not support block-level scoping, only function-level. Therefore, any variable assigned within the loop will be available outside the loop as the last available value. To get the result you are looking for, you will need to use a closure within the loop:

def addAttrs(attr_names):
  def deco(cls):
    for attr_name in attr_names:
      def closure(attr):
        def getAttr(self):
          return getattr(self, "_" + attr)
        def setAttr(self, value):
          setattr(self, "_" + attr, value)
        prop = property(getAttr, setAttr)
        setattr(cls, attr, prop)
        setattr(cls, "_" + attr, None)
      closure(attr_name)
    return cls
  return deco

Using the closure closure, the attributes assigned within getAttr and setAttr will be scoped correctly.

EDIT: corrected indentation

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this example illustrates excellent the level of scoping, that I had a little bit trouble with. – Philipp der Rautenberg Feb 3 '12 at 9:02

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