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I've learnt that the only public class in a Java file must also have the main method. However, below you can see the main method inside an inner class instead? What is the rule with regard to the main method definition in a source file?

public class TestBed {
    public TestBed() {
        System.out.println("Test bed c'tor");
    }

    @SuppressWarnings("unused")
    private static class Tester {
        public static void main(String[] args) {
            TestBed tb = new TestBed();
            tb.f();
        }
    }

    void f() {
        System.out.println("TestBed::f()");
    }
}
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That should work if you make that inner class public. –  Thilo Feb 3 '12 at 9:06
    
It works as it is. In my case though, I had to escape the $ character to launch from the shell: $ java TestBed\$Tester –  Vlad Feb 3 '12 at 9:13
    
@Thilo - the NESTED class need not to be public. Being public was only true for the (very) first versions of Java. Nowadays Java is smart enough to find the method in private classes (tested with Java 5, 6 & 7 on Windows XP) –  Carlos Heuberger Feb 3 '12 at 9:53
    
"Nowadays Java is smart enough to find the method in private classes". I don't know if that is smart. There is probably a reason for having made the class private. The method itself still needs to be public, I hope. (OTOH, unless we are talking about remote access, class visibility is a code structuring tool, and not a security feature, so either way would be fine in this case) –  Thilo Feb 3 '12 at 10:00
    
@Thilo : d'accord - that is why I wrote smart in italics... and yes, the method must be public, at least as documentation of the java tool of oracle. –  Carlos Heuberger Feb 3 '12 at 12:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you want to start a class with java (the Java launcher: java test.MyClass) then this class must have a main method with the well known signature.

You can have a main method with the same signature anywhere you want. But don't expect that the launcher will find it.

P.S. The name of the language is Java, not JAVA.

There is a minor detail:

You may do this:

package test;

public class Test {

    /**
     * @param args the command line arguments
     */
    static public class A {

        public static void main(String[] args) {
            System.err.println("hi");
        }
    }
}

java test.Test$A

but this is non standard ...

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I'm wondering if it will work in this case, since the class containing the main-method is private, static and not used anywhere. –  Kurt Du Bois Feb 3 '12 at 9:06
    
@KurtDuBois - it works, but you have to use the correct class name TestBed$Tester to start it. –  Carlos Heuberger Feb 3 '12 at 9:35

Any class that can have a static method can have a public static void main(String[] args).

This includes:

top-level classes (whether public or not), e.g.

public class Foo {
    public static void main(String[] args) { 
        System.out.println("Hello"); 
    }
}

and inner static classes (whether public or not) (like your example).

It does not include:

  • anonymous classes
  • inner non-static classes

So both of these are illegal:

public class Foo {
    private Object bar = new Object() {
        public static void main(String[] args) {
            System.out.println("Hello");
        }
    };
}


public class Foo {
    private class Bar {
        public static void main(String[] args) {
            System.out.println("Hello");
        }
    };
}
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pedantic: inner classes can not have a static method - JLS 8.1.3: [...]Inner classes may not declare static initializers (§8.7) or member interfaces[...]. There are no inner static classes, per definition (JLS 8.1.3 again) an inner class is a non-static nested class. –  Carlos Heuberger Feb 3 '12 at 9:44
    
@CarlosHeuberger You're absolutely right. I was sloppy in my terminology, using the word 'inner' interchanably with 'nested'. –  Chris B Feb 3 '12 at 11:25

Every Java application must have a main method. It’s the starting point for the execution of the code in the application. Its method signature is:

public static void main(String[] args) 

A static inner class is a class that is defined inside of a different class's definition and marked as being static.

For example, if the outer class is named TestBed, then an inner class of TestBed, which is named Tester, would be compiled into TestBed$Tester.class. The separation of .class files means that you can keep the supplemental, nested code tightly coupled to the primary, outer class.

They are in the same source file, and the inner class is actually inside the outer class. All that and you don't have to pay any sort of deployment or run time cost.

By using static inner classes, you can add additional support functionality to your systems for capabilities such as testing, while incurring no penalties in normal, production deployment.

To execute the main() method of that TestBed.Tester class,

% java TestBed$Tester
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being pedantic: per definition (JLS 8.1.3) an inner class is a nested class that is not declared static! –  Carlos Heuberger Feb 3 '12 at 9:26

This is interesting as the code will compile and run in Eclipse, but will just compile from using commmand line. When you run from eclipse it will find the static main method from within the inner class and run it.

But when running java TestBed from the command line you will get error - Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoSuchMethodError: main which is a valid error as you have not defined your main method in main class.

Why would you want to define your main method in an inner class? Your main method should be defined in public class, this is not a rule but common practice.

In below code I've moved the main method into outer class which works both in Eclipse & command line :

public class TestBed {
    public TestBed() {
        System.out.println("Test bed c'tor");
    }

    @SuppressWarnings("unused")
    private static class Tester {

    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        TestBed tb = new TestBed();
        tb.f();
    }

    void f() {
        System.out.println("TestBed::f()");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wrong: command line - java TestBed$Tester - works fine (Windows XP, Java 6 & 7) and there is no need for the class having the main method to be public. –  Carlos Heuberger Feb 3 '12 at 9:31
    
Of course java TestBed$Tester works fine, java Tester will not. " there is no need for the class having the main method to be public" I realise its not needed, I was just suggesting what is common practice, at least in what I have seen. I've never seen the need to declare a main class "final" or "abstract". –  blue-sky Feb 3 '12 at 9:48
    
sure java Tester will not work, neither in Eclipse. You have to use the fully qualified, correct class name. And you was not only "just suggesting what is common practice" - you wrote that it will only compile from using the command line (but not execute) - that is wrong - it runs from the command line! What about "final" or "abstract"? You are the first to use these terms here (BTW abstract would not compile with static, and main must be static). –  Carlos Heuberger Feb 3 '12 at 10:08
    
The class (as originally posted) will compile and run in Eclipse. Eclipse automatically finds the inner class and executes its main method, but running from command line you have to point it to the inner class main method. "it runs from the command line" yes it runs from command line but you need to point it at inner class. When you run the java class via Eclipse, it runs without error if main method is in inner class, or main method is in outer class. I take your points –  blue-sky Feb 3 '12 at 10:11
    
sure, you always have to point to the correct class, no matter if outer or NESTED... same in Eclipse. Just because Eclipse finds it, does not mean that you don't have to point to the class. See what happens when you have two main methods, one in the outer class, the second in the nested class! BUT that is not RELEVANT. You wrote that it does not run from the command line and that main must be declared in a public class - both are wrong (no matter if you MEANT something else)! –  Carlos Heuberger Feb 3 '12 at 10:27

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