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I have a perl script that is executed by the Jenkins CI, but when it tries to execute the following code i get a "Inappropriate ioctl for device" error.

$) = $new_group;

if($!){
   print STDERR $! . "\n";
   print STDERR "Failure to change permissions to: Gid: $new_group \n";
   next;
}   

$> = $new_user;

if($!){
   print STDERR $! . "\n";
   print STDERR "Failure to change permissions to: Uid: $new_user \n";
   next;
}

But while if a do the same manually like this, i receive no error

perl -e '$) = 99; if($!){print $! ."\n";} $> = 99; if($!){print $!."\n";}print     `whoami`;'

Any clues why this error occures, and what i means? I have search the net, but it seems to occur when filehandlers are open, havnt seen any examples on it occuring when changing users.

All scripts are executed as root.

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2 Answers 2

To debug the code, use this method, and see whats going on. Print out each variable content when you receive an error. Please use strict and warnings, they heelp you a lot!

Please include the output if you cannot solve this problem with this method.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

$) = $new_group;
warn "\$), \$new_group: ".Dumper($),$new_group);
...
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I know what the content of $new_group is, and its a valid group id. That i can see from the printout inside the if. –  Joakim Feb 3 '12 at 12:48
    
But what if $new_group contain a '/r' in the end or something like? Print it out with Data::Dumper and prove it :-) –  user1126070 Feb 13 '12 at 9:01

$! is only useful directly after a failed system call. When setting the group or user is successful, you don't really know what will be in $!, and can't rely on it being a false value. You might trying using 'or die ' when setting the user and group, or maybe just comparing $) and $> to $new_group and $new_user again after you attempt to set them.

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Thnx, good point. So basicly the perl documentation is kind of off, since it states that you have to check $! for errors. While if the command is a success, that variable($!) might contain something else. Which then makes no point of checking it for a failure –  Joakim Feb 6 '12 at 13:23

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