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This is the login function written using MySQL way However, the problem exists when it convert into PDO way

MYSQL:

    <?
function confirmUser($username, $password){
   global $conn;
   if(!get_magic_quotes_gpc()) {
    $username = addslashes($username);
   }

   /* Verify that user is in database */
   $q = "select UserID,UserPW from user where UserID  = '$username'";
   $result = mysql_query($q,$conn);
   if(!$result || (mysql_numrows($result) < 1)){
      return 1; //Indicates username failure
   }

   /* Retrieve password from result, strip slashes */
   $dbarray = mysql_fetch_array($result);
   $dbarray['UserPW']  = stripslashes($dbarray['UserPW']);
   $password = stripslashes($password);

   /* Validate that password is correct */
   if($password == $dbarray['UserPW']){
      return 0; //Success! Username and password confirmed
   }
   else{
      return 2; //Indicates password failure
   }
}

PDO:

<?
function confirmUser($username, $password){
   global $conn;

   include("connection/conn.php");

   $sql = '
    SELECT   COALESCE(id,0) is_row
    FROM     user
    WHERE    UserID = ?
    LIMIT 1
';

$stmt = $conn->prepare($sql);
$stmt->execute(array('09185346d'));
$row = $stmt->fetch();

if ($row[0] > 0) {
       $sql = '
    SELECT   COALESCE(id,1) is_row
    FROM     user
    WHERE    UserPW = ?
    LIMIT 1
';
$stmt = $conn->prepare($sql);
$stmt->execute(array('asdasdsa'));
$row = $stmt->fetch();
    if ($row[0] > 0) 
    return 2;
    else
    return 0;
}
elseif ($row[0] = 0)
{return 1;}   



}

What is the problem ?? And is it necessary to include bind parameter in PDO??? THANKS

share|improve this question
1  
What is your problem exactly? –  TJHeuvel Feb 3 '12 at 9:31
2  
Error messages? Unexpected behavior? Spontaneous combustion? Give us something to work with here. –  Juhana Feb 3 '12 at 9:32
    
Sorry the problem is that it will fall into the return 0 no matter password incorrect or username not exists –  user782104 Feb 3 '12 at 9:36
1  
Differentiating between "Username failure" and "Password failure" is bad practice, as it allows people to test for valid usernames before testing for valid passwords. Combine your queries and just have an "Authentication failure". - Also in your code, the password supplied doesn't even have to belong to the correct user, any username, and any password will allow you to authenticate as long as they are in the database somewhere. –  Leigh Feb 3 '12 at 9:40
    
i found it error when COALESCE(id,0) is_row –  user782104 Feb 3 '12 at 9:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Aside from your use of global and your include inside the function (you should investigate an alternative way of structuring your function not to do this), I would change the code as follows:

$sql =
    'SELECT  id
    FROM     user
    WHERE    UserID = ?
    AND      UserPW = ?
    LIMIT 1';

$stmt = $conn->prepare($sql);
$stmt->execute(array(
    '09185346d',
    'asdasdsa'
));

if ($stmt->rowCount() == 1) {
    return 0;
}
else {
    return 1;
}

Combing the queries to give a general Authentication error, instead of allowing people to trial valid usernames, and then valid passwords, and then using PDOStatements rowCount method do see if your row was returned.

To answer your second part, it is not necessary to specifically use bindParam to prevent SQL injection.

Here's a quick example of the difference between bindParam and bindValue

$param = 1;

$sql = 'SELECT id FROM myTable WHERE myValue = :param';
$stmt = $conn->prepare($sql);

Using bindParam

$stmt->bindParam(':param', $param);
$param = 2;
$stmt->execute();

SELECT id FROM myTable WHERE myValue = '2'

Using bindValue

$stmt->bindValue(':param', $param);
$param = 2;
$stmt->execute();

SELECT id FROM myTable WHERE myValue = '1'

share|improve this answer
    
is it necessary to use bind para to prevent sql_injection??? –  user782104 Feb 3 '12 at 9:54
    
i have to go for a while. i will accept the answer later –  user782104 Feb 3 '12 at 9:54
    
The whole point of prepared statements is to 1) Speed up repetitive queries by caching the servers query analysis, and 2) separate variable parameters from the body of the query to prevent things like SQL injection. It is not necessary to explicitly use bindParam to prevent SQL injection. bindParam binds a reference to a variable to your prepared query, which is evaluated at the point you call execute and is useful when you explicitly want to typecast the parameter being bound. bindValue is the same, but the bound parameter is evaluated immediately. You don't have to use them. –  Leigh Feb 3 '12 at 10:03

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