Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an object with a char Array; where the first 5 bytes(char in C++) are additional data and everything afterwards is a string message.

So my question is how can I get a string from starting index 5 way up to the last byte?

I know there is memccpy, but it requires an ending char, which I can't know beforehand. I am aware there is a string object in C++, but the idea is to send back and forth a byte array which contains the data and message. So in a sense I serialize and deserialize back and forth.

Any suggestions?

Edit:

Packet * Packet::create(byte const data[])
{
    //Concat all first 4 byte values to a uint32
    unsigned int length = data[0] << 32 | data[1] << 16 | data[2] << 8 | data[3] << 0;

    //4th element is packet type
    PacketType type = (PacketType)data[4];

    string packetData;

    packetData.clear();
    char * cdata;
    //Check packet data is present
    if(sizeof(data) > 5)
    {
        //string s((char)data);
        //packetData = s.substr(4, s.length() - 4);
        strncat(cdata,data+5,sizeof(data)-5);
        packetData.append(cdata);
    }

    //Create new packet;
    Packet * packet = new Packet(length,type,packetData);

    return packet;
};

It won't accept data[] even when I cast it to char. The argument isn't a pointer?

Edit::

Packet * Packet::create(char const * data)
{
    //Concat all first 4 byte values to a uint32
    unsigned int length = data[0] << 32 | data[1] << 16 | data[2] << 8 | data[3] << 0;

    //4th element is packet type
    PacketType type = (PacketType)data[4];

    //Set packet data, if available
    string packetData = (sizeof(data) > 5) ? string(data+5):"";

    Packet * packet = new Packet(length,type,packetData);
    return packet;
};

I still have to test this, but I had to use char, how do I use my own typedef in this situation?

Also what is the difference between "char * data" and "char data[]"

I thought arrays and pointers are one and the same thing.

share|improve this question
    
Use: strncpy or strcpy, and arrays are contiguous in memory so just use, (source + 5) as source buffer, that ensures you copy from 5th character in your source char array. –  Alok Save Feb 3 '12 at 9:47
1  
If you can change your consumer to accept a begin/end pair, you don't need to make any copies at all... –  Kerrek SB Feb 3 '12 at 10:08
    
sizeof(data) is wrong. It'll give you the size of the pointer, not the length of the c-string it points to. Use strlen(data) instead. –  jrok Feb 3 '12 at 11:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You mentioned "know there is memccpy, but it requires an ending char, which I can't know beforehand". Does that means that your serialized data doesn't have neither the size of the data nor a delimiter? Without that how do you expect "string packetData = (sizeof(data) > 5) ? string(data+5):"";" to work? For the serialization you could send the size of your data as well in the header. Then use the simple memcpy.

share|improve this answer

use strcpy with charArray + 5 as source parameter.

You should also know of strlen which gives you the string's length [might be needed to allocate the char[], if there is not known upper bound for it].

EDIT: code snap:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>
using namespace std;
int main() { 
  char in[] = "XXXXXqwerty";
  //dynamic allocation using strlen() if you don't have upper bound for in
  char* out = new char[strlen(in) - 4]; 
  strcpy(out,in+5);
  cout << out;
  delete[] out;
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.