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have an issue with a fairly basic query I'm attempting to write.

select count (p_id) as mycustomer from person where date_active = null;

Which doesn't work. (runs, but returns 0) However, the below statement does (and returns a number), can anyone help?

select count (p_id) as mycustomer from person wher date_active > '1-MAY-09';

I am trying to find the total number of p_ids in a table that have a date_active as null. (They do exist, I can see them!) Thanks

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4  
null never equals null in SQL. Do we have to have yet another question on it? – Damien_The_Unbeliever Feb 3 '12 at 10:44
    
Apologies, I'm fairly rusty on this stuff, and a search of similar questions didn't help. :( – GrumP Feb 3 '12 at 10:48
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think you need to use:

select count (p_id) as mycustomer from person where date_active is null;
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Thanks, I figured it out. Apologies for the silly question! – GrumP Feb 3 '12 at 10:50

Try the following

select count (p_id) as mycustomer from person where date_active is null;

= null is incorrect and won't do what you want. This link gives more detail

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You must use the is oprator to find null:

select count (p_id) as mycustomer from person where date_active is null;

NULL isn't a value (it indicates the absense of a vlaue), so you can't use scalar oprators like =, !=, <, > etc. in conjunction with NULL.

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this should work:

select count (p_id) as mycustomer from person where date_active IS null;
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select count (p_id) as mycustomer from person where date_active IS null;

(Note the IS NULL operator instead of =)

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@onedaywhen You are absolutely right! – vc 74 Feb 3 '12 at 12:10

SQL does not work with binary logic (only true and false). It works with (at least) ternary logic (true, false and null). That third value complicates the evaluation of logical conditions (like the = you have in the condition).
Basically, any expression that involves a null, will return a null value, and since null is never true, the query won't return any rows, just like if you wrote

select count (p_id) as mycustomer from person where 1 = 2

To work around this there are some special syntax constructs, most common being the is null and is not null conditions. So as the other answers pointed out, to get the null values you need to write

select count (p_id) as mycustomer from person where date_active is null

Interesting thing about nulls is that they are neither equal not inequal to other nulls.

select * from person where null=null

and

select * from person where null!=null

both won't return any rows.

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"any expression that involves a null, will return a null value" -- some expressions may evaluate to UNKNOWN (subtle difference): there are exceptions e.g. IS NULL operator evaluates to TRUE or FALSE only. UNKNOWN is a logical value in three-valued logic, whereas null is a placeholder for a value. – onedaywhen Feb 3 '12 at 11:14

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